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Author Topic: The Bull Who Wept for Its Life  (Read 6541 times)

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proudlao

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The Bull Who Wept for Its Life
« on: February 26, 2013, 12:07:03 PM »
Animals have feelings too. This is what this next story is telling us if proven real.

A bull in Hong Kong was reported to cry and somewhat beg for his life.



http://www.weirdasianews.com/2012/11/20/bull-wept/



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HUNG TU LO

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Re: The Bull Who Wept for Its Life
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2013, 01:10:42 PM »
Just because an animal has tears doesn't mean it's crying.

Maybe we should open up a bank so mother and father cattle can start saving up for their offspring's future? Yes, animals do have feelings and some animals (like dolphins, elephants, and apes/monkies) actually exhibit emotions way beyond other animals. But to say that animals are fully conscious of themselves and life, and to suggest this bull was aware that it was at a slaughterhouse, was going to be killed for meat, and begged to be spared, is ridiculous.

Just speaking the truth.



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wtf

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Re: The Bull Who Wept for Its Life
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2013, 12:53:03 PM »
ur an idoit hung 2 short..... im sure if u were the bull, ull be crying like a little babe too...



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HUNG TU LO

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Re: The Bull Who Wept for Its Life
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2013, 06:45:28 PM »
ur an idoit hung 2 short..... im sure if u were the bull, ull be crying like a little babe too...

If I was a bull, I wouldn't be fully conscious of myself and I wouldn't understand the notion of life and death. This is why you shoot a squirrel, wild boar, or rabbit, you sit still for a few minutes and the other ones will come out again and even eat or play around their dead mate! You can shoot them again and repeat the process if there are more animals around!

They are not self-aware at the level that humans are. They are not pondering how life can be better. They operate on genetics instincts to eat, sleep, shit, and mate.



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TruthAboveKnowledge

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Re: The Bull Who Wept for Its Life
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2014, 04:33:28 PM »
Hung to Lo,

I beg the differ.  Have you lived on a farm where cattles are raised naturally.  It takes 9 months for a cattle fetus to develop, just like humans.  When the baby calves are born they instinctly knows who their mother is through smell.  I have a relative who raises these baby calves and when he separates the younglings from their mother to be transported in a few days, the mother cries non-stop when their baby makes a calling for help.  If you don't believe me, go ask the farmers who raise these cattle naturally and they'll tell. 

It's too bad that information like this seems to shock people because cattles are raised by the thousands only to be butcher for meat.  The baby calves are taken away immediately after they are born and never had the chance to be nurtured by their mother.  They are then rounded up with others within their age groups for the proper feeding and vaccinations. 

As to your analogy with animals not caring for other animals or showing emotional attachments to their own kind, here is my rendition.  When we see a thief or a criminal getting slained by the authorities, do we show emotional attachments for them?  When the news report about a person who was driving drunk, struck and kills an innocent bystander do we show sympathy for the bystander or the drunk driver?  Too often the drunk driver gets away with killing and too often they get away with the incident with only a few years in jail.  But do we and should we sympathize for those kind of people?  My first natural instinct is a NO.



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Offline duckwingduck

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Re: The Bull Who Wept for Its Life
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2014, 01:15:27 AM »
If I was a bull, I wouldn't be fully conscious of myself and I wouldn't understand the notion of life and death. This is why you shoot a squirrel, wild boar, or rabbit, you sit still for a few minutes and the other ones will come out again and even eat or play around their dead mate! You can shoot them again and repeat the process if there are more animals around!

They are not self-aware at the level that humans are. They are not pondering how life can be better. They operate on genetics instincts to eat, sleep, shit, and mate.

So you were a bull and that's how you know this?



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HUNG TU LO

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Re: The Bull Who Wept for Its Life
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2014, 11:46:55 AM »
When the baby calves are born they instinctly knows who their mother is...

As to your analogy with animals not caring for other animals or showing emotional attachments to their own kind, here is my rendition.  When we see a thief or a criminal getting slained by the authorities, do we show emotional attachments for them?

If the first thing an incubated baby chick hatches and sees a human, that chick will believe that human is its parent. If you separate a baby monkey as soon as it is born and place it in care of humans, that baby monkey will look at the human(s) as the parent. And your point is? We are talking about self-awareness and the understanding of life and death. Like I said, if animals were fully self-aware and understood life and death as the way humans do, that baby monkey and chick would look at a human and think "You're not my mommy!", squirrels would open up acorn banks and white-tailed deer would have a calendar and note that hunting season is coming up and they need to get the fukk out of public hunting grounds until post-season. I didn't say animals are stupid - a squirrel can recall where it hides 100 nuts when the snow melts and I can barely recall what I had for dinner last night. But a squirrel sure as hell won't be able to read what I'm writing here.

And your story of human emotions just proves my point further - humans (once they become a certain age) are fully self-aware, understands life and death, and displays all of the emotions that we humans show. The fact that we cry tears when something bad happens, does not mean that a rabbit or a cow that has tears on its eyes means it is crying the same way humans do. There is a term for that and it is anthropromorph ism - depicting inanimate and/or supernatural objects (like God) or animals to display human attributes and behavior. Usually, anthropromorph ism is used to subjectively skew a topic as a prejorative (example: "Why do you guys eat meat?! Don't you know they cry and have feelings just like you and I?).


So you were a bull and that's how you know this?

Like I said, you shoot a wild boar dead in its track, 20 other boars run away. Wait 10 minutes, all 20 come back and start eating roots RIGHT BESIDE THEIR DEAD PAL YOU JUST SHOT. Shoot another boar dead, they run away. Wait 10 minutes, THEY ALL COME BACK OUT AND START EATING AGAIN RIGHT NEXT TO THEIR DEAD PALS. If animals understood life and death like humans, they would all start crying after their pal is shot and they would all run away from the hunter. It doesn't take a rock scientist to realize that humans are wired way differently from animals. With the exception of a few monkey species, the great apes, and dolphins, all other animals have near-zero self-awareness and doesn't understand life vs death. I didn't say intelligence here. We are talking self-awareness and (the possible) understanding of life and death.


to really know is to go to the slaughter house (long cheng)...the animals knows exactly what they are about to face, often crying and trying to escape when ushered to the kill pen.

They try to escape because that's what all animals respond to something (like a human) caging them, pushing them, and chasing them. A chicken is not going to jump on your knife for you even though it has been domesticated for thousands of years. All animals with an eyeball (as well as humans) has moisture-producing glands otherwise, they would all go blind when the eyeball dries out or gets dust on it. Just because the moisture comes out doesn't mean it is crying just like a human does.


Obviously, you all have a problem with the scientific method.



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HUNG TU LO

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Re: The Bull Who Wept for Its Life
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2014, 11:04:20 AM »
Let's end this ridiculous discussion as it's a waste of space:

do fish feel pain? Your emotions would say yes and you would apply anthropromorph ism and claim that if you stuck a needle point hook in my mouth, it would hurt.

But what you fail to neglect is simple biology....sci ence. Our human brains are so developed and we have a part of our brain and registers "PAIN!" from pain receptors. Fish also have pain receptors BUT their brains are the size of a pea. There is no part of the fish brain that would suggest that it interprets pain as sharp, throbbing, and excruciating like humans. Fish do feel stress and they sense NOCICEPTION - sense of pain even without pain, like when you dream you are falling and right before you hit the ground, you get that "PAIN!" sensation but it doesn't really hurt, or when you nearly miss a step going down the stairs and you catch yourself and your back of the neck is tingling and your nerves are shaking.

There are some humans, on very rare occasion, that are born and cannot feel pain. This doesn't mean there is no pain! They still have pain receptors, it's still registering "PAIN PAIN PAIN!" but the missing key here is that their brain is not receiving the pain stimulus and therefore, cannot translate it. A fish's brain is similar in that it doesn't receive pain stimulus because it can't!

The point is, humans and animals are different. Stop anthropromorph izing animals.



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HUNG TU LO

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Re: The Bull Who Wept for Its Life
« Reply #8 on: July 15, 2014, 07:47:02 PM »
How about the elephant that cry as he take his first step to freedom?  :'( BTW, I just read it on yahoo news.

The fact that we cry tears when something bad happens, does not mean that a rabbit or a cow that has tears on its eyes means it is crying the same way humans do.

All animals with an eyeball (as well as humans) has moisture-producing glands otherwise, they would all go blind when the eyeball dries out or gets dust on it. Just because the moisture comes out doesn't mean it is crying just like a human does.



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