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Author Topic: Chinese Language vs. Hmong Language....  (Read 33618 times)

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TheAfterLife

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Chinese Language vs. Hmong Language....
« on: November 10, 2014, 08:32:20 PM »
Chinese and Hmong are easy. It's just that I see Hmong as like Spanish and Chinese are more like the French by language. For example, I can share by saying:

我有一个弟弟和一个姐姐。你呢?
Translation in Hmong Pinyin: "Wod yaum ib nkawb tib-ti hawv ib nkawb ntsej-ntse. nid ne?"

Hmong Translation: Kuv muab ib tug kwv tib thiab ib tug tus muam. Koj nes?

Compare grammer structure:

1. Wod yaum ib nkawb tib-ti hawv ib nkawb ntsej-ntse
     我      有   一    个     弟弟    和   一    个       姐姐

2. Kuv muab ib tug kwv tib thiab ib tug tus muam.

Pretty cool, huh? What's ur thoughts? Oh, I made the Chinese Symbol easier for you to see. On number 1, you will see how Chinese symbole language that is written under number 1. Chinese is a lot easier than Hmong; however, Hmong still sounds better because we don't have that much vowel tones like the Chinese people. So, as you can see, Chinese people do have "Ua" in their language of tonal vowel; however, "yu" will become like a French accent because of "U (Ooooh)." Hmong don't have that so we make it, "Wb" instead. It's easier to pronouce Wb instead of Yu.

I hope you guys enjoy on learning about Chinese because I am really motivated...



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Offline theking

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Re: Chinese Language vs. Hmong Language....
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2014, 09:32:10 PM »
Chinese and Hmong are easy. It's just that I see Hmong as like Spanish and Chinese are more like the French by language. For example, I can share by saying:

我有一个弟弟和一个姐姐。你呢?
Translation in Hmong Pinyin: "Wod yaum ib nkawb tib-ti hawv ib nkawb ntsej-ntse. nid ne?"

Hmong Translation: Kuv muab ib tug kwv tib thiab ib tug tus muam. Koj nes?

Compare grammer structure:

1. Wod yaum ib nkawb tib-ti hawv ib nkawb ntsej-ntse
     我      有   一    个     弟弟    和   一    个       姐姐

2. Kuv muab ib tug kwv tib thiab ib tug tus muam.

Pretty cool, huh? What's ur thoughts? Oh, I made the Chinese Symbol easier for you to see. On number 1, you will see how Chinese symbole language that is written under number 1. Chinese is a lot easier than Hmong; however, Hmong still sounds better because we don't have that much vowel tones like the Chinese people. So, as you can see, Chinese people do have "Ua" in their language of tonal vowel; however, "yu" will become like a French accent because of "U (Ooooh)." Hmong don't have that so we make it, "Wb" instead. It's easier to pronouce Wb instead of Yu.

I hope you guys enjoy on learning about Chinese because I am really motivated...

Some words are similar sounding but major determining factor is which dialect is used i.e., Mandarin/Cantonese, Hmong White/Green.



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Minion1

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Re: Chinese Language vs. Hmong Language....
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2014, 11:15:41 AM »
Laus as in old age is the same pronunciation in Mandarin and Hmong.  Been watching too much Chinese history dramas. 



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Minion1

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Re: Chinese Language vs. Hmong Language....
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2014, 11:16:11 AM »
Same as tswv yim =idea. 



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HUNG TU LO

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Re: Chinese Language vs. Hmong Language....
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2014, 04:13:57 PM »
Hmong say "idea" incorrectly. It's "tsuv yim" and not "tswv yim".

Chinese Pinyin
chu3 yi4

NOT

cheu3 yi4



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chidorix0x

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Re: Chinese Language vs. Hmong Language....
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2014, 05:11:05 PM »
Chinese and Hmong are easy. It's just that I see Hmong as like Spanish and Chinese are more like the French by language. For example, I can share by saying:

我有一个弟弟和一个姐姐。你呢?
Translation in Hmong Pinyin: "Wod yaum ib nkawb tib-ti hawv ib nkawb ntsej-ntse. nid ne?"

Hmong Translation: Kuv muab ib tug kwv tib thiab ib tug tus muam. Koj nes?

Compare grammer structure:

1. Wod yaum ib nkawb tib-ti hawv ib nkawb ntsej-ntse
     我      有   一    个     弟弟    和   一    个       姐姐

2. Kuv muab ib tug kwv tib thiab ib tug tus muam.

Pretty cool, huh? What's ur thoughts? Oh, I made the Chinese Symbol easier for you to see. On number 1, you will see how Chinese symbole language that is written under number 1. Chinese is a lot easier than Hmong; however, Hmong still sounds better because we don't have that much vowel tones like the Chinese people. So, as you can see, Chinese people do have "Ua" in their language of tonal vowel; however, "yu" will become like a French accent because of "U (Ooooh)." Hmong don't have that so we make it, "Wb" instead. It's easier to pronouce Wb instead of Yu.

I hope you guys enjoy on learning about Chinese because I am really motivated...

LMAO!!!  ...  :idiot2:

It took me, on my own, 2-3 weeks to learn how to read and write Hmong "Ntawv Hmoob".

I have been trying to learn Chinese/Mandarin for the last 2-3 years, on my own, and have gone no where.  Period.  (So your opinion that Chinese is easier than Hmong is pure "BS".)

FACT1:  Hmong and Chinese have about the same tones -- 8.  Some would say 7, but that is because they have excluded/forgot the "neutral" tone.

FACT2:  Hmong ONLY has about 23 (don't recall exact number) of CONSONATE variations.  Once you learn/memorize this.  DONE DEAL.  U r practically an EXPERT.

FACT4:  To basically master and be fluent in Chinese/Mandarin; experts argue/AGREE, one has to learn/memorize at minimum 200-500 unique Chinese characters to consider oneself learned.

FACT5:  Hmong is Romanized Alphabets -- for speaking, reading, and writing.  Chinese IS NOT.  (Pinyin, though Romanized/English, it is purely for "pronunciation/speaking" -- not for writing Chinese.)

FACT6:  Chinese (IS NOT) a lot easier than Hmong whatsoever.  (That comment is idiotically ludicrous  ...  LMAO!   :knuppel2:)

BTW -- Your Hmong (Ntawv Hmoob) is  :D  ...  no wonder you think Chinese is easier  ...   ???


« Last Edit: November 11, 2014, 05:21:09 PM by chidorix0x »

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chidorix0x

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Re: Chinese Language vs. Hmong Language....
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2014, 05:18:28 PM »
Hmong say "idea" incorrectly. It's "tsuv yim" and not "tswv yim".

Chinese Pinyin
chu3 yi4

NOT

cheu3 yi4

U must mean HA'Mung say "idea" = Tsuv Yim  ...  LMAO!   :2funny:  ...   >:D

I have NEVER personally heard a Hmong/Mong, OGs and New-Gens,  throughout my life, ever have said "idea" = Tsuv Yim  ...   :idiot2:



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chidorix0x

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Re: Chinese Language vs. Hmong Language....
« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2014, 08:55:36 PM »
Here is FACTUAL proof of how utterly EZ it is for a native Chinese learner/speaker to learn and speak Hmong fluently -- in no time flat.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InjO8qyJyYU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nw_efp9zsNI




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chidorix0x

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Re: Chinese Language vs. Hmong Language....
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2014, 09:02:10 PM »
And there is this PROOF (of Hmong fluency among others) in present day America  ...   8)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JcMd9Yfwtf8



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chidorix0x

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Re: Chinese Language vs. Hmong Language....
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2014, 09:17:33 PM »
Quote from: TheAfterLife link=topic=363678.msg4687822#msg4687822 date=1[b
[/b]415920901]
...
Here is some proof of how it is hard for a Chinese learner to learn Hmong. She'd even claim that Hmong is hard yo.

EPIC FAIL!!!  ...    ::)

She clearly stated, starting at 2:03, QUOTE "Kuv mus kawm 40 hnub xwb os ...", UNQUOTE.

(Apparently you failed to listen to/validate your own EVIDENCE as it IS rather self-incriminating  (and BACKFIRED)  ...   :idiot2:  ...   :2funny:)



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chidorix0x

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Re: Chinese Language vs. Hmong Language....
« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2014, 09:56:11 PM »
Here is a subjective (non-Hmong-centric or based) argument for which languages are the most difficult to learn (for a native English speaker) -- at the BOTTOM of the web link.

http://www.lingholic.com/hardest-languages-learn/

Notice that all English-based languages; Spanish, French, Afrikaans (even Hmong) etc., are considered EASY.

MEDIUM, are Thai, Hindi, Russian etc.  (Hmong could fall here I suppose if anyone wants to make that argument.  But since it is English-based technically, it is in the EASY category, or SUPER-EASY if there was a category.)

HARD, are Chinese etc. ...  (Need more be said.)



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chidorix0x

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Re: Chinese Language vs. Hmong Language....
« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2014, 10:09:41 PM »
The first one, I believe he had some troubles of speaking fluent Hmong. If you think Chinese is harder, the first one proves to me that Hmong is not easy for foreign speaker in the Mainland of Asia (Excluding Japan). The second one, she's a lot a better and I assume that probably she has gone to a Hmong school. Dude, it's common sense to see this:

5 tones vs 8 tones. Chinese has 5, that's easy. Chinese don't have the 3 extra. Moreover, their Roman english is a lot easier to write and read. For Hmong, you need the B, J, V, D, --, G, S, and M. Those will be a lot harder for any foreign people to read or recognize. To speak it, what I know that if you are from Asian Mainland (China, Korea, and Indochina), then it would be a lot easier for each other understand. However, to speak fluently by comparing which one is the hardest would be Vietnamese, Hmong, and other 8 or more tonal language.

In China, no one (especially Minorities which she is a part of), has next to ZERO opportunity to attend school -- Chinese or not -- without major funding; meaning a lot of $cash$, to pay for school.  China has NO National Public School System like the USA (West), where anyone and everyone, Chinese and Minorities, can (or must) attend.  Plus, China pre-Post Secondary schools only teaches Chinese, not any other foreign language.  Thus, the thought of a school (or college) that teaches Hmong (to her) is utterly preposterous.

The B, J, V, D, --, G, S, and M which are tonal markers found and used within the Hmong language is very misleading in terms of actual usage -- for speaking, reading, and writing.  Once (IF) you ever master the Hmong Written Script (RPA), you will understand my point.  (No need to elaborate/explain it here.)



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Offline dlabtsi_os

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Re: Chinese Language vs. Hmong Language....
« Reply #12 on: December 16, 2014, 01:36:51 AM »
Hmong say "idea" incorrectly. It's "tsuv yim" and not "tswv yim".

Chinese Pinyin
chu3 yi4

NOT

cheu3 yi4

I'm pretty sure it's Tswv Yim. If I recall tswv mean boss or ownership. And one of the Chinese character for idea by itself means boss. As for Hmong vs Chinese, Hmong use a lot of archaic Chinese word.



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atthetop

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Re: Chinese Language vs. Hmong Language....
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2015, 10:01:06 AM »
Here is FACTUAL proof of how utterly EZ it is for a native Chinese learner/speaker to learn and speak Hmong fluently -- in no time flat.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InjO8qyJyYU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nw_efp9zsNI

Implying Chinese was their first language

and WTF? You need to know a minimum of 1000 words/characters to be able to read a newspaper, not 200-500 




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Offline dlabtsi_os

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Re: Chinese Language vs. Hmong Language....
« Reply #14 on: November 24, 2015, 03:33:54 PM »
Oh really...inter esting. I would like to know. Can you show some that I can learn?

I am not well verse in Chinese. But I can recognize some word/characters in pinyin.

Here is a link of Mandarin Chinese: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandarin_Chinese
If you scroll down to grammar, it has this.

我   给   你   一本   书 。
wǒ   gěi   nǐ   yběn   shū.
I   give   you   a (one)   book.

In Hmong you can read that as

Kuv kev nws ibphau sau. Although sau is use as writing and a verb; Ntawv as paper or book and as a noun. Sau is the equivalent of shū.

Direction examples

西 Xi = Sis = West
Example: Mus/Moog sis toj. Head West.

东 Dong = Ntoog = East
Example: Mus/Moog doog toj. Head East.

北 Bei = Peg or Pem =North
Example: Mus/Moog pem toj. Head North.

南 Nan = Nas, Laj, or Laaj = South Example: Mus/Moog nas toj. Head south.

山 Shan = Sab/Saab = Mountain side
Example: Nyoj/Noj sab/saab ntoog ntuj qaj. Its back at eastern side mountain.

Titles

子= Zi = Txiv/Txwv = Father
Nws yog kuv txiv/txwv. He is my father.

主 Zhu = Tswv = Boss/Owner
Example: Nws yog tus tswv. He/She is the owner.

王 Wang = Vaj/Vaaj = King
Example. Nws yog peb tug vaj/vaajtswv. He/She is our lord.

Seasons and Time examples

日 = Ri = Zwj, Hnub/Nub = Sun
Example: Hnub/Nub no yog zwj hnub/nub. Today is Sunday.

月 = Yue = Hlis/Lis = Moon
Example: Luj hlis/lis zoo nkauj. The moon is beautiful.

年 = Nian = Nyia/ Naj = Year
Example: Nyia/Naj xyoo kuv mus/moog ua si. Every year I go play.

点 = Dian = Teev = Hour
Example: Tshuav ib teev. There is one hour left.

时 = Shi = Sij = Time
Example: Tsis yog sij hawm. It is not time yet.

代 = Dai = Tam = Era
Example: Peb nyob/nob in tam. We lives a life time/generation.

冬 = Dong = Daus/Dlaus = Winter/Snow
Example: Hnub/Nub no/nuav yog lub caij los daus/dlaus. It is winter or Today it is snowing.

夏 = Xia = Xya/Xyaa or So = Summer
Example: Yog caij so/xya/xyaa. It is summer.

春 = Chun = Ntshua = Spring
Example: Paj ntshua nplaim. Rose or Flower blossom or flower leaves springs.

秋 = Qiu = Xyoo = Fall/Autumn
Example: Ib xyoo dhau/dhlau lawm. One year has past.

You can tell the way Hmong use these vocabulary are much different then Chinese. There are still way more though.


« Last Edit: November 24, 2015, 03:56:26 PM by dlabtsi_os »

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