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Author Topic: Dear Morning Fog  (Read 13248 times)

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Re: Dear Morning Fog
« Reply #90 on: May 03, 2019, 09:44:54 PM »
Dear Morning Fog,

Bamboo Flower and I are expecting a little boy soon. The doctor says he already looks like me. But, you know it: joking, joking.

But with Bamboo Flower's beauty, I expect that he will look very cute.

So, a deep sadness tormented me tonight because I am about to return to the U.S. Not that I don't feel loved by Bamboo Flower. I do. She does care about me just as much as I care about her. With this new baby, too, we have grown to love each other even more. We both aren't even thinking about the baby as much as we think about each other these days. But it's the baby that has made us so.

Anyway, flashback to that fight Steaming Bell had against the thugs.

"Go?" Steaming said to the guy. "I don't go. I don't run. I brought you here to give you all a lesson."

"I don't fight you," said the man.

"Then you run or I beat you," Steaming Bell said. "Whose idea for you to rob me?"

"Oh. Boss. Our boss," he said. "He's gang leader in our group. He has many bigger connections. Lots of gangs. Lots of thieves. Lots of robbers. No respect for women. No respect for weak people. We take every time we see someone."

"Not today," Steaming Bell said.

"I don't want boss to see me. I go now," man said and flashed into the deep bamboo jungles on the hillside.

Steaming Bell was already surrounded by all the others.


« Last Edit: May 04, 2019, 05:08:07 AM by Reporter »

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Re: Dear Morning Fog
« Reply #91 on: August 07, 2019, 05:59:50 PM »
Dear Morning Fog,

Steaming Bell said he is so happy to have gotten out of that fight with the thugs.

"No time to think," he said. "I just moved as needed...First, upper cut to the jaw of the guy right in front. He fell off.

'Then once I knew it, my arms were already wrapped around the neck of the guy to the far left. Wrapped like a chain around a metal pole...Same time, my horizontal front kick straight to the face of the guy to the far right.

'All three almost fell down at the same time."

"And the big guy? The boss?" I asked.

"He didn't have time to react. But as soon as he was ready to come towards me, I was already holding tight onto the neck of that guy. I was behind him as the boss was approaching us.
The boss's feet were flying from the left and the right and the left and the right. Almost like a propeller that was spinning from both sides. So, I had to use the guy to block the boss's kicks."

Each foot slap almost threw Steaming Bell and the guy in his arms down, Steaming Bell said.

Then the guy died and Steaming Bell had nothing to use to block those kicks anymore.

A duel that went through the rest of the day and night--Steaming Bell had to fly over tree tops and across valleys to avoid being hit for three days and nights, eating just the fruits he picked up on trees and vines and drinking only the dew he came across.

"The night fights were tough," Steaming Bell said. "The guy had an almost invisible, long glass stick. I could not see the stick coming. Not only was it night and dark but the stick was transparent and, you know it--invisible. So, I had to lead him to moonlight spots just to see some glare each time he swung out the stick. And I felt his breathing each time he exerted for his efforts. That was how I was able to know when and where the stick was coming from. Suddenly, he hit a large stone the size of an elephant that broke his stick in two halves.

"We turned to hand-to-hand combats and feet-to-feet, too. Yet he couldn't kill me. I couldn't kill him.

"Then by morning, I managed to break a bamboo stick and started shaking all of the dew off the whole jungle. Wherever he was reaching for, I rushed ahead and shook down the leaves. He had no drink and he started to slow down his moves.

"Of course, I collected some dew for me already."

It was starvation and thirst that made the thug leader give up. He finally told Steaming Bell how to get back to Chiang Mai from there.

Anyway, we'll be in Loei towards Ban Vinai soon, Morning Fog.


« Last Edit: August 07, 2019, 08:27:09 PM by Reporter »

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Re: Dear Morning Fog
« Reply #92 on: September 11, 2019, 12:03:39 PM »
Dear Morning Fog,

Steaming Bell says he would like the police guy who ran into him after his fight with the thugs--he would like this officer to tag along with us to Ban Vinai.

But I am declining that. I appreciate that he helped Steaming Bell find his way back to Chiang Mai. But I have two reservations about this guy: 1. He might not be as sincere as he was with Steaming Bell, now that we are seen as capable and financially strong, and 2. I don't like just having him tag along without paying him for his time. The cost can't be tiny, since it's quite a distance over many days.

So, I  have convinced Steaming Bell not to take along this guy. I'm sure we can handle any other gang along the way.

Bamboo Flower might tag along. She says she wants to see our old camp site and what I used to do as a little kid there. But I'm not sure I want to expose her to any danger along the way, especially now that she's due soon.

We'll see.

But just four days ago, I was challenged by the snake clan. I was driving a pickup truck to a farm to pick up some corns. On the way there, I suddenly saw a snake the size of a typical toe on the road right on my side just before the yellow line towards the oncoming traffic. Because I didn't see it until the last second, I ran over its body on the mid-section.

I wasn't sure if it had died at that time. But after I had picked up the bucket of corns and returned there, I saw its white belly facing up. It no longer moved. Looked like some other cars may have run over it, too. It wasn't exactly where it was originally; it had been pushed farther away from the center yellow line.

So, I knew it had died.

I apologized to it and said it was because I could not stop for any second to avoid the accident.

Apparently, the local snake clan felt I had run over this one on purpose. So, they tested me to see if I was believeable or if I had any hatred towards snakes.

On my second trip to pick up a second bucket of corns, I saw another same-size snake just a few houses away on the same road, the same side of the road, and the same distance from the middle yellow line. This time I saw a figure like a tiny twig ahead of me in the distance. And it moved just a bit. So, I knew it was another snake.

I drove to close to it, slowed down a bit and veered to the far right to avoid running over it. After I had returned from the farm, the snake was gone.

Now, the snake clan finally was convinced that the first one died of an unavoidable accident and not on purpose. If I had run over this second one, too, they would now think I had wanted to just get rid of their kind. And they would start a war against me, and maybe our kind.

But I'm glad that's over with now. I feel terrible and very apologetic about the death of that snake. But it was not my fault. It put itself on a human-man road, and so I couldn't avoid running over it. They will just have to accept their loss.

Anyway, Steaming Bell has recovered from his fight. Got just a few scratches and bruises on his shoulders and back. We'll be heading to Ban Vinai soon.



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Re: Dear Morning Fog
« Reply #93 on: September 12, 2019, 06:46:01 PM »
Dear Morning Fog,

The bully has continued to do what he does best: bullying other martial artists around town in the States. Just the other day, he lured another master to an alley. That master was not used to the tight space of that alley and was also claustrophobic but  yet still dared to challenge the bully. After two hours of sparring and even hopping onto the walls to kick at one another, the bully subdued the master to a corner. The master's left arm got broken and a bone had pushed out his flesh.

Two guys on a nearby window hear the bully declare victory on the spot.

Steaming Bell is bothered by this. But we also agree that we have to accomplish our mission of coming to you first. After all, we have come this far already. And it has been decades since we first set foot on Ban Vinai.




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Re: Dear Morning Fog
« Reply #94 on: September 23, 2019, 09:09:01 PM »
Dear Morning Fog,

Bamboo Flower is about to give birth to our first daughter.

By that, I further suggest that there will be a second.

That's because we are planning on having a rather large family of about three children and two adults.

We'll see if Bamboo Flower can take the pains of giving birth after this first one.

The doctors in Chiang Mai tell us she's due in just two months. Of course, her belly is showing.

And, you know, the bigger her belly is, the more beautiful she becomes. I think part of that is due to her personality.

I've realized that, as we get older, we don't want coarse or thorny conversations or acts. We want soft words and loveable acts. That does not have to be the acts and words of what America has come to know as Giligan's Island's Ginger. But just not so thorny words and acts. Bamboo Flower is full  of stuff like that and more to me.

So, I have moved Steaming Bell to a local motel with my own expenses. He would be there until we are able to find a safe travel plan to Ban Vinai.



« Last Edit: September 25, 2019, 07:26:41 PM by Reporter »

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Re: Dear Morning Fog
« Reply #95 on: September 25, 2019, 07:36:14 PM »
Dear Morning Fog,

We have decided to take the bus instead of driving on our own or paying a taxi service to Ban Vinai.

Steaming Bell now agrees that the more unrelated people we have with us, the safer. So, the bus is the most direct and safest way over any private jet and any train that would further require us to commute from distant stations to Ban Vinai.

The bus station tells us it would take about 12 hours, due to the various rest stops along the way.

But that will be only to Loei's capital--Loei also. From there, to you might take a few more hours. We might have errands or other rest stops in Pak Choum. Just because there are so many natural street foods such as freshly-netted mud fish, minuscule dark crabs and shrimps as well as bamboo shoots, sticky rice, etc. along Loei's border and the nearby provinces, we might spend quite a bit of times once in Loei. 

We'll see. I'll alert you again soon.


« Last Edit: September 26, 2019, 02:59:22 PM by Reporter »

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Re: Dear Morning Fog
« Reply #96 on: December 29, 2019, 04:31:36 PM »
Dear Morning Fog,

Muang Loei is not as much a part of Ban Vinai as Ban Vinai is a part of it: both are within the territory of Loei Province of Thailand just across the Mekong River from Laos. But they are an hour and a half from each other. And people have brought Loei items to Vinai but never the other way around.

Muang Loei residents have never envied Ban Vinai. To them, it's just a small, remote village, even considered backward at that. Some don't even know about it. But our elders envied Muang Loei just as much as even elite Americans envy Washington, DC or as much as most foreigners envy the U.S. but only because our elders didn’t know more about Bangkok at the time. 

Every hard-earned little coin and paper bill—and big ones, too--that our elders had saved up from selling noodles or backyard chards or butchered by-the-kilo pork and beef and even those larger exchanged amounts they had received from America and France went into the three-hour round-trip bus ride to and other purchases in Muang Loei. A new pair of flip-flopd, a new T-shirt with Thai writings on it or dress shirt or both, a pair of rubber shoes or some times dress shoes, ties, and jackets—brand-new and never second-handed—much raised the wearers’ status in the camp and gave the family enough self-esteem and pride to continue living on after all the despairs from the war across the Mekong River. Good thing the CIA, the UN, and the UNCHR and other NGO took care of most of our foods.

Of course, as you also know, one who had returned from Muang Loei would look a bit more handsome or beautiful as a result, just as many elders now would look like heroes to the young chicks in Laos and across most of Southeast Asia.

But Loei, with close to 700,000 people—from infants to seniors--is not all that it’s imagined to be, Morning Fog.  There’s not much night glittery even in the center of the city. No. Nothing compared to Bangkok, which is not only the capital of the country but the next best thing to places like Tokyo or Paris or New York—you know, it glitters every night and day with flashing signs beaconng people to doors and tables of goods and services and car honking all over. Beauty beyond belief for the eyes of a war-torn, formerly agrarian culture.  Ban Vinai’s dilapidated conditions just augmented Loei’s appearances. But somehow Bangkok was no more than just a last stop to Minnesota for our elders and no one really aspired to take the bus beyond Muang Loei at the time.

Just step a few buildings away from the center of it all and one goes straight into pebble roads with farm houses scattered here and there. That was not hard to do at all.

But Muang Loei has its advancements that only Ban Vinai could ever dream of. There’s a nationally known university here and various technical colleges that would take over the high school graduates to prepare them for the responsibiliti es of families and beyond. Professional boxers here have won national competitions in Bangkok. Many professionals such as doctors, lawyers, and engineers all over. Our elders missed all of these, because they had focused more on what really caught the eyes and not the imagination. Okay, they didn’t miss the doctors because many ailed people in Vinai had treated here.

So, again, we obviously hadn’t heard much about Bangkok except that it was the place we would bus to before heading to Minnesota.
I expect you to just fly over Loei and go straight to Bangkok if you wanted to travel to the U.S. one day.

Steaming Bell and I are near Pak Choum and should be in Na Kho and Vinai soon. Steaming Bell says not to worry about the bully, because he's way back in America and, apparently, does not know we're are here.


« Last Edit: December 30, 2019, 11:21:58 PM by Reporter »

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Re: Dear Morning Fog
« Reply #97 on: January 19, 2020, 06:29:52 PM »
Dear Morning Fog,

We are done with Muang Loei and will be heading to the next whatever town the bus may take us before stopping in Pak Choum.

I have asked the bus driver to make sure we stop in Pak Choum, because I want to see what it's like now compared to what has been in my head the year my family first arrived on Thai shores and passed through Pak Choum then. Steaming  Bell, too, says he remembers just a bit of it, partly because his brother used to exchange manpower with a Thai farmer there for some daily bahts.

Earnings were little, Steaming Bell says. But his brother needed to marry a hot Hmong chick in Ban Vinai just down the valley and up the other hillside from where you are, Morning Fog. They were in love and have had many trips to the top of that hill, Steaming Bell says his brother has told him. So, little by little picking cotton balls and cutting woods earned his brother enough to buy two genuine silver bars. His relatives just added 500 bahts more and she became his with the community's permission.

Anyway, Ta E  has reported back to us by dropping a face cloth of blood writings about the situation above.

That guy who pulled the plug of the Heavenly Pool just to flood the Heavens so he could create a flood that he alone could undo--well, he got discovered when the Northern Heaven Court sent messengers to investigate the cause of the flood. The man's plan was to take over Ta E's career by claiming Ta E had traveled down here and leaving the Heavens in a disaster that the man would solve if he was guaranteed Ta E's job.

Both leaders from the West and South somehow bought into that. But the Northern and Eastern leaders sent a messenger to the even higher Heavens above them to send down a neutral investigator to check on the cause. The man is a Western birth boy whose parents had some connections to higher authorities in the South. That's why those sections seemed to be taking his side.

The higher Heaven's investigator didn't even need to come down. His kaleidoscope from his cloud tower could show video-like images of all life from millions of years past to the millions of years in the future. So, he just cut up that piece that was in question and shone the video onto the ceilings of the court that was in charge of the man's case.

The video shows the man making his plan even when he was still down here on Earth. He knew Ta E was busy with Steaming  Bell and me, and so he quickly died and got transported back to the Heavens. His hope was to take over Ta E's job and, therefore, career, while Ta E was unavailable to run the responsibiliti es above.

The man realized the Heavens would see him if he had just gone to the pool's plug any time of the day, including day night times. So, he cut up some kaying leaves and wrapped himself up very well before he walked to the pool. The Heaven's eyes could not see through those leaves. But the video has captured his foot steps right from his door; he did not cover his feet up with kaying leaves.

"The evidence does not show your true image at the pool," says the Northern Judicial King. "But we see your foot steps from your door. Now you are the one pointing fingers at someone else. How do we know you didn't intentionally cause the flood?"

"Those are foot steps only," says the man. "They could have been anyone else. I am not the only one living there."

Yet he could not prove any other man lived at his house.

The Northern Judicial King ordered some guards to take the man back to those foot prints and matched his foot prints with those. It has turned out that his feet fit exactly those foot steps that the video images have portrayed.

Now, all judicial officers of all four corners of the Heavens agreed that this man was guilty and should be chained up for one Earthly life times--120 years--before he would be allowed to reincarnate again.

Steaming Bell and I are having some fried fish on Ma Kham Wan street this afternoon. We'll get on the bus in the early morning, Morning Fog.


« Last Edit: January 19, 2020, 06:35:44 PM by Reporter »

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