Advertisement

Author Topic: Due to the underage law here, the song that many Hmong men fantasized about, RIP  (Read 87 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline theking

  • Elite Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 33180
  • Respect: +838
    • View Profile
...back in the early 80s, many grown azz Hmong men in their 20s and 30s child molesters be dreaming and fantasizing when this song came out because they knew they couldn't get an underage girl without any repercussion like in Laos and Thailand due to the underage laws here.. RIP Barry!:

"Benny Mardones passed away at 73"

Here's a cover  O0:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_aVkOOYODZI

 



Like this post: 0

Adverstisement

Offline theking

  • Elite Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 33180
  • Respect: +838
    • View Profile
Don't be that guy..(idiot)  ;D:

Minnesota man, 21, claims he was following Southeast Asian 'bride-napping' customs when he 'abducted 15-year-old girl and tried to force her marry him'




Like this post: 0

Offline theking

  • Elite Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 33180
  • Respect: +838
    • View Profile
Nor this guy (another idiot) because in America, you will get your AZZ handed to you for being this stupid when caught red-handed...unlike Laos, Thailand and Vietnam.. ;D:


A court commissioner refused Thursday to reduce the $150,000 bail of a Hmong man who has been in jail on sex assault charges stemming from his cultural marriage to a woman who was 12 years old at the time.






Like this post: 0

Offline hmgROCK

  • Elite Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 12880
  • The Hmong Nostradamus
  • Respect: +130
    • View Profile
We all know you are a pedo

Lol

Stop jerking off to dragon ball z
Lose some weight and get yoself a real woman



Like this post: 0
God did not created man...man created god

Offline theking

  • Elite Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 33180
  • Respect: +838
    • View Profile
"We all know you are a pedo" ..labeling yourself the "fat 40 virgin living in mommy's basement" AND I HAVE PROOF..

"Lol

"Stop jerking off to" your fake "wife"
"Lose some weight and get yoself a real woman"



Like this post: 0

Offline chimhoang

  • PH Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 25
  • Respect: +1
    • View Profile
jokes aside, dude actually sings pretty well hitting all the notes



Like this post: 0

Offline theking

  • Elite Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 33180
  • Respect: +838
    • View Profile
The story behind the song is quite sad really:

Benny Mardones:

Well, I was living in Spanish Harlem on Riverside Drive in Manhattan. In my building was a family, husband and wife and three kids, 17, 16, and 15. I was sort of the resident rock star from having the first album out, Thank God For Girls, back in '77 on Private Stock Records. Hadn't written "Into the Night" yet, which became, of course, my signature song. We'd see the kids around the building - everything was cool and my son's mother was friends with the family.

So one day I get a knock on my door. I open it up, and all three of the kids were there crying. The 17-year-old girl, she said, "Our father left my mother and ran off with another woman in the chorus line of the show." He was a struggling set designer on Broadway, and he had landed a major show. Instead of coming home to his family and saying, "Our ship has come in, we're going to move out of here, go to Westchester, get a house, have a better life," he decided to run off with some 24-year-old girl in the chorus line and left the family destitute. I put my arms around them, all three, and I said, "Everything's going to be all right. I promise you." Of course, I didn't have any idea how everything was going to be all right, but it just broke my heart.

So I gave them each a job. I told Shawn, who was the boy, "After school every day, you come to my house and you can run an errand for me" and I'd give him a $20-dollar bill every day to go out and get me half a gallon of milk or a pack of cigarettes or something. Just a reason for him to go and when he came home I would always let him keep the change. That way he had about fifty bucks a week in his pocket. This was back in '79, so fifty dollars a week for a kid in school, 15, was pretty good money.

The older daughter, I paid her to come every Saturday and clean my apartment and I'd give her fifty bucks. But the 16-year-old girl was named Heidi and she was the most devastated, because she was daddy's little girl. She was just devastated at what had happened and I felt so bad for her. I said, "Look, Heidi, I'm up all night, I sleep late," because I was sort of living the life of a rock star even though I wasn't a rock star. I was just starting to make records, really. I had a Basset Hound named Zanky, who ended up on two or three albums - sleeve pictures and stuff. He was a famous Basset hound in rock and roll for a while. I said, "Here's my key. Every day before school you take Zanky out for a walk in the morning, let him do his business, come back, feed him, and then go to school, and I'll give you $50 a week for doing that."

So the kids were holding it together; they had money in their pockets so they could buy things for school and just things that teenagers need. I had such disgust with the father that I think if I could have found him, I'd have had somebody from Miami have a sit-down with him. I was that upset. I mean, how can you do that? When "Into the Night" hit for me, first thing I did was pay off my mother's house, take care of my sister and my family so that they were taken care of. And so this guy did just the opposite.

So one night Robert Tepper and I were up writing songs. It was about a week before we were leaving for Miami to cut the first big album, which was Never Run, Never Hide. We thought that we already had the hit song, so did Polydor Records. It was a song called "Might Have Been Love." That's why the album was called Never Run, Never Hide, because the opening line of "Might Have Been Love" is, "I'd never run, I'd never hide, I can't remember the last time I cried. It might have been the day they took Elvis away." But at the last minute we're sitting there one night at my apartment trying to write. Bobby kept playing the chord changes and we tried 18 melodies and 30 kinds of lyrics and all of a sudden the key in the door turned and I said, "Oh my God, it's daylight." Because we liked to keep the blinds down.

And in she walks, 16 years old, dressed for school in a miniskirt, little stacked heels, adorable, 16-going-on-21. She said, "You've been up all night?" and of course it was obvious. I said, "Yeah, we have." She says, "Okay, come on, Zanky," and she walks the dog out. When she leaves and goes out the door, my partner goes, "Oh, my God." I said, "Hey, Bob. She's just 16 years old, leave her alone." And literally five minutes later I said, "Play that lick again, Bobby." So he played the lick and I went (singing), "she's just 16 years old, leave her alone, they say." Then I thought about her dad and what he had done, and that's where I got (singing), "Separated by fools who don't know what love is yet." The chorus was, "you're too young for me, but if I could fly, I'd pick you up and take you into the night and show you love like you've never seen." Then the verse "It's like having it all and letting it show. It's like having a dream where nobody has a heart. It's like having it all and watching it fall apart." Because his success was not the family's success; it was just his. "I can't measure my love there's nothing compared to it" - it was all about the abandonment of this family and this 16-year-old girl.



Like this post: 0

 

Advertisements