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Author Topic: Hmong History FAQ  (Read 65037 times)

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beester

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Re: Hmong History FAQ
« Reply #75 on: May 27, 2010, 11:51:53 AM »
It's a fact.  Everybody knows that Hmong people are an ancient Saiyan race.  You should check out my spirit bomb sometimes.  It's devastating.  Lol.

I like that reasoning best! I want to be a super saiyan!



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Amara

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Re: Where did HMONG(we) come from?
« Reply #76 on: June 23, 2010, 02:14:11 PM »
The Spirit Catches You mentions a Hmong Wall, a smaller version of the Great Wall.

Whoever said the wall of China was built partially to keep the Hmong out is so so wrong. First of all, the Hmong from China are geographically located in Southern China. The great wall is in Northern China. I highly doubt that the Hmong traveled North to fight the Chinese.

"Their ancestors originated in southwestern China, in the provinces of Yunnan, Guizhou, Sichuan, and Hunan. For several thousand years, the central Chinese government dominated by Han Chinese basically left the Hmong (called Miao by the Chinese) alone, as long as they paid their tributes to the Chinese. However, the last dynasty in China, the Qing (1644-1911), founded by Manchus, followed a different policy. Qing armies and officials oppressed the Hmong, who rose in rebellion. In the early nineteenth century, this political persecution, along with increasing population pressure, led some of the Hmong to migrate southward into mainland Southeast Asia, where they settled in the mountainous regions of northern Burma, Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam." - Sucheng Chan, Hmong Means Free

http://www.hmongnet.org/publications/hmf-intro.html

As someone else stated above, those Hmong people with blue eyes and brown hair are purely albino. 

The Southern Great Wall was built by the rulers of the Ming Dynasty as a military blockade against the Miao people of the south. In 2001, the wall underwent major restoration to restore it back to its former state.

Here is a mini-documentary about it:

Part 1:

Part 2:

Part 3:









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I_love_Assistant_OK

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Re: Hmong History FAQ
« Reply #77 on: July 25, 2010, 12:18:33 AM »
I've just watched Chinese Paladin 3 and on Episode 18, there was a scene where the village women come and tell the priest that their husband is being seduced by a Miao woman. I just find this to be amazing because Miao is Hmong so that mean that the descendant of Nawu is of Hmong origin. Also meaning that the mother of Lang'er in Chinese Paladin 1 is Hmong. The lady that waited 200 years for her lover is of Hmong origin. ---------------i just find this to be pretty cool especially since Hmong/Miao was mentioned in a drama that I love.



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kabvang

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Re: Hmong History FAQ
« Reply #78 on: September 25, 2010, 01:50:04 AM »
I've just watched Chinese Paladin 3 and on Episode 18, there was a scene where the village women come and tell the priest that their husband is being seduced by a Miao woman. I just find this to be amazing because Miao is Hmong so that mean that the descendant of Nawu is of Hmong origin. Also meaning that the mother of Lang'er in Chinese Paladin 1 is Hmong. The lady that waited 200 years for her lover is of Hmong origin. ---------------i just find this to be pretty cool especially since Hmong/Miao was mentioned in a drama that I love.
oh my gosh!
i saw that drama too! its so good. and i agree with 100% of what you said. I also thought that it was really interesting that she actually dressed a bit like hmong in parts of the drama too.



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HmongLessons

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Re: Hmong History FAQ
« Reply #79 on: February 21, 2011, 12:24:07 PM »



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shina

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Re: Hmong History FAQ
« Reply #80 on: September 03, 2011, 09:41:23 PM »
It would be nice if we have someone who is interested in searching for our history.  Hmong has a unique history, but the only thing Hmong people seem to know is Gen. Vang Pao, but there were so Hmong prior to Vang Pao that have done great things for the Hmong people.  Do you know who was the first formally educated Hmong person in Laos?  I forgot his name but he was a Yang.  My grandma used to have a picture of him with Nao Chao Lyfoung.  There were the first Hmong in Laos that went to school.  There were so many great story my grandma used to tell me about the people during the early time.  I search for information on Hmong, and it looks like there are too much information on the Vietnam War and the Hmong but nothing else important.  It almost feels that Hmong people did not exist before the Vietnam War.  Sad isn't it???  I think we should leave politics behind and search for facts about the Hmong people prior to Vietnam War.  I'm talking about FACTS not GOSSIPS.    I heard plenty of gossips, but not facts.  When people gossip, they don't have the facts.  They only repeat what they heard and then add a few of their own story into it to create a completely new story.  This is what Hmong are very good at.   My grandma told me that her ancestors came from Mongolia where it was dark 6 months and light 6 months.  It was a hard life so they migrated to China looking for a better place.  The Chinese didn't like Hmong because we didn't want to pay taxes.  So after each harvest, they packed up and left to find a new place.  They kept moving and the Chinese kept on chasing them because Hmong didn't want to share their crops.  That was how her ancestors came to be in Laos.  The family splat up over the years while in China so we can't trace our root anymore.  Interesting story but we can't trace our root.  Who are the Hmong?  Where did we come from?



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Moospej

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Re: Hmong History FAQ
« Reply #81 on: September 29, 2011, 03:29:25 PM »
Kuv yuav me ntsis li qhov kuv paub..txawm qhov twg tsis meej pem los nej mam li muab kho rau.

Neeg tshwm sim zaum 1 - Neej thiab dab, mi xyoob mi ntoo, mi tsiaj txhu nrog rau 1 puas tsav yam uas muaj sia puav leej hais ib hom lus.

Neeg tshwm sim zaum 2 - Yog lub caij txiv neej yug menyuam, tuag 3 zaug mam li tuag tiag tiag. kab tshoob kev khoob thiaj rhawv muaj, lub mob lub ntshaj thiab li poob los txog, ib siab ob qiag thiaj li mam rhawv tau.

Neeg tshwm sim zaum 3 - Yog lub caij poj niam los yug menyuam, tuag 1 zaug lawm xwb, neej thiab dab, xyoob ntoo, tsiaj txhu nrog rau 1 puas tsav yam uas muaj sav puav leej hais tsis ib hom lus lawm.

Puas muaj leej twg tseem ceev tau cov hauv paus dab neeg xws li:

1. Tus koov nyiaj thiab tus koov kwb     
2. Tooj thiab Hlau   
3. Kab tshoob kev khoob     
4. Neeb yaig       
5. Lus ntees tuag   
6. Lub nrua tuag
7. Rab Qeej
8. Tus txhib ntawg



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Gatorade_Guy

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Re: Hmong History FAQ
« Reply #82 on: November 12, 2011, 04:58:14 PM »
look people, it's already been settled that hmong people were formed from the outcast clans of mongolia. we didn't want to participate in khan's violent conquest so we were banished to a remote area in china, where the chinese eventually booted us to the mountains of southeast asia.



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realism

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Re: Hmong History FAQ
« Reply #83 on: April 12, 2012, 05:36:49 PM »
look people, it's already been settled that hmong people were formed from the outcast clans of mongolia. we didn't want to participate in khan's violent conquest so we were banished to a remote area in china, where the chinese eventually booted us to the mountains of southeast asia.

sources please...



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Gatorade_Guy

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Re: Hmong History FAQ
« Reply #84 on: April 15, 2012, 09:42:32 AM »
lol isignia's remarks are hilarious. for sure that person is an idiot on so many levels.



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realism

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Re: Hmong History FAQ
« Reply #85 on: April 19, 2012, 07:02:05 PM »
insignia isn't even in this thread



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koj_tus_hlub

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Re: Hmong History FAQ
« Reply #86 on: May 04, 2012, 03:53:34 PM »
Interesting...I've seen some albino too.  Wierd...
But never seen blue eyes hmong b4.  Always white/brown hair and red hair. 

Where I live, there is a Hmong family that has two children with white hair and blue eyes. I think it is unique to see someone like them.



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King_Kong

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Re: Hmong History FAQ
« Reply #87 on: July 03, 2012, 01:50:54 PM »
Nanman (simplified Chinese: 南蛮; traditional Chinese: 南蠻; pinyin: Nánmán; Wade–Giles: Nan-man; literally "southern 'barbarians'") were aboriginal tribes who lived in southwestern China. They may have been related to the Sanmiao, dated to around the 3rd century BC. The Nanman were multiple ethnic groups including the Miao, the Kinh, the Thai, and some Tibeto-Burman groups such as the Bai. There was never a single polity that united these people. During the Three Kingdoms period, the state of Shu Han ruled over southwestern China. After the death of Shu Han's founder, Liu Bei, the tribesmen of the region rebelled against Shu Han's rule. The Shu Han chancellor, Zhuge Liang, led a successful expedition to quell the rebellion.

In the novel Romance of Three Kingdoms, the rebellious Nanman tribes are depicted as an alliance under the leadership of Meng Huo. Meng Huo is said to have submitted to the rule of Shu Han after being captured and released no fewer than seven times by Zhuge Liang. This story has been adapted into many other works of fiction over the centuries, as well as video games based on the era. However, there is little historical evidence to attest to its veracity.

During the Tang Dynasty, the Miao (Hmong) ceased as a major non-Chinese group except in the province of Yunnan where they were ruled by the six "Zhao" (詔). The southernmost, known as Mengshezhao (蒙舍詔) or Nanzhao (南詔), united all six Zhaos and founded the first independent Nanman state during the early 8th century. The royalties were thought to be the Bai people. Nanzhao regularly paid tributes through the head of military district Jiannan Jiedushi (劍南節度使). When the Tang Dynasty gradually declined, Nanman gained more independence, but was assimilated by later dynasties. However, some of Nanzhao's cultural influence was carried south due to its location

Taken from Wikipedia,
If there were only documents that can prove this.....



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Muaj Tsim

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Re: Hmong History FAQ
« Reply #88 on: January 28, 2013, 04:57:02 PM »
you can find where hmong originated from by relating hmong practices like bride kidnapping.  Bride kidnapping is only practiced in central asia or eurasia.  Hmong originally uses spoons NOT chopsticks, spoons are western and central asia!  Chopsticks came from chinese influence.  and the sport tub lub (top Spin)  is western.  no culture in china or souteast asia plays that.  look at hmong ancient writing, looks pretty much mediteranean/middle eastern.



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NceegVaj

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Re: Hmong History FAQ
« Reply #89 on: April 06, 2013, 01:08:07 PM »


TOO MUCH SPECULATION AND ASSUMPTION SHi.Tz in this thread.



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