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Messages - theking

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2
FAKE photo due to no "P" based on the standards he set for his own photos:


3
Says the "BIGGEST TROLL" (per the neutral PH members, their words, not mine).. ;D

And oh yeah, WELPS so much for "NO BODY CARES...no view, no comment"....and this is a "news thread" to boot... :idiot2: ;D

4
General Discussion / Agree with this to some degree
« on: December 03, 2021, 10:26:02 PM »
Why are flash mobs looting stores? Because today’s America gave them the go-ahead
Read more at: https://www.miamiherald.com/opinion/opn-columns-blogs/leonard-pitts-jr/article256234457.html#storylink=cpy



Why would they do this? That question rises inevitably from a new wave of so-called flash-mob robberies, thieves by the dozens invading retail stores to simply take what they want. It’s happened in California, Illinois, Minnesota and Maryland. Retailers ranging from Nordstrom to 7-Eleven have been hit. For some, the search for answers will be an invitation to uncork pet theories about poverty, permissiveness or punishment. But none of those things is unique to this era.

Think about it: This model for robbery has always been available to enterprising thieves. It’s simple math. What can one or two security guards do if 60 people decide to just walk in and loot the place? Granted, advances in communications technology make that easier to organize now than it once would have been, but still, a crime wave like this theoretically could have happened in 1985 or 2002. It makes sense to wonder why it didn’t. What is it about this particular era that has inspired this particular trend? Here, then, is another pet theory: The social covenant has shattered.

Meaning the thousand unspoken understandings by which a society functions, the agreements to which we all sign on without a word being spoken. Some are encoded in law, others just encoded in us. Either way, they are rules — “norms” might be a better word — people usually obey even when they could get away without doing so. You don’t stand facing the back wall of an elevator. In heavy traffic, you take turns merging. You stop at the red light even when the street is deserted. And, oh yes, you don’t join a mob to ransack a store. While there is almost certainly some hardcore criminality leading this crime wave, one suspects that many of its foot soldiers are people with little in the way of serious police records. How much do you want to bet most of them will turn out to be ordinary, workaday folk who got the word there was free stuff to be had, and all you had to do was take it, like some giddy holiday from social norms? Where would they have gotten the idea such a holiday was even possible? Surely the opportunistic looting that marred last year’s largely peaceful protests for racial justice helped influence them. But that’s hardly the only — or, arguably, even the most corrosive — transgression of social norms we’ve seen in recent years. To the contrary, we’ve seen police and other authority figures exempt themselves from mask and vaccine mandates — and dare mayors and governors to do anything about it. We’ve seen ex-public officials thumb their noses at congressional subpoenas. We’ve seen a seditionist mob breach the U.S. Capitol and be lionized for it by certain members of Congress and the media. And we’ve seen a president who delighted in shattering norms, refusing to provide his tax returns, flouting the emoluments clause of the Constitution, openly politicking on government property . . . the list goes on. And

Worst of all, we’ve seen little in the way of accountability for any of it. So the question isn’t how ordinary people could have gotten the idea a holiday from social norms was possible, but how could they have not? Everywhere you look, someone else is seceding from the covenants that make it possible for civil society to function. Which makes these smash-and-grab robberies seem less a mystery and more just another troubling reflection of our times. Why would people do this? Heck, why would they not?

5
General Discussion / Re: Covid is now the party of the unvaccinated
« on: December 03, 2021, 10:21:58 PM »
Says the "BIGGEST TROLL" (per the neutral PH members, their words, not mine)... ;D

6
..but is still here continuing to lie away:

Quote
These 16 U.S. Citizens Who Left America For Good Are Sharing Their Reasons For Moving And Honestly, It Makes A Lot Of Sense
https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/people-explaining-why-left-u-204602960.html

For some, the American way of life can be exhausting, frustrating, and difficult. Due to the divisive social climate, long working hours, and expensive cost of living, some U.S. residents are looking to live abroad. So, when Reddit user u/FrozenChair asked people to explain why they left America for Europe, they gave some eye-opening reasons.
1."I moved to Europe seven years ago. Our motivation at first was having children without going into debt. After living here a few years we were able to buy a house and live a lifestyle that was once considered the American dream."
A family standing outside of their new home
"I also found that life is less materialistic here. People still have gardens and walk to places they want to go to. I just find it to be a more sustainable environment for my family."

—Netwelle

2."I live in Berlin. I'm still trying to get used to my five weeks of vacation. All vacation is paid vacation, and it's standard everywhere. I also get a two hour lunch and have a 32 hour work week. This is is literally going to add up to years more with my family. It just makes the quality of life so much better."
- ADVERTISEMENT -

—witaji

3."I hated having to drive everywhere in the U.S. I know it happens in Europe too, but there still seems to be more of an appreciation for the slow life. Plus, being able to walk more and use public transport — I just feel happier and healthier with this lifestyle."
—wingswednesdays

4."I moved to Spain from the U.S. six years ago. As much as I miss the U.S., I have no plans to move back. Healthcare in America scares the bejeesus out of me, especially as I age. I just had surgery on an injury that cost me nothing in Europe."
A doctor and patient talking in an examination room
—sweetest_oblivion

5."My partner and I moved to Sweden two years ago. We were both working extremely long hours in the US and it was killing us. We were both making a lot of money, but it was coming at too great a cost. There's also the political and social situation. Society is extremely polarized in the U.S. Now, we have six weeks of vacation, guaranteed healthcare, and a political system that isn't a complete shitshow."
—hbarSquared

6."I would move if I could for the food alone. Not only does the majority of it taste better in Europe, but it's also more nutritious. Food additives that are illegal in Europe are abundant in the US. Crops have been so modified that they have a fraction of the nutrients. Even baking ingredients like flour and sugar are way less healthy here in the US because of how they are processed."
—danish_princess

7."I moved from the U.S. in 1980 and live in England now. There are hardly any guns here. Handguns are outlawed."
—Doggyboy
—Doggyboy

8."It comes down to the fact that the U.S. does not care about its people — only protecting the capital of the wealthy. There's expensive healthcare, a car-dependent infrastructure, a lack of public transportation, increasing homelessness, etc."
—Takosaga

9."I moved years ago for marriage. My life is immeasurably better here in so many ways. My children don't know what an active shooter drill is, I don't question taking them to a doctor when they need it, and I don't have to buy school supplies."
—pineapplewin

10."My SO and I moved to Greece in 2016. I eat mostly vegan and the quality and price of basic raw ingredients are incredible."
A woman holding a basket of fresh vegetables
—AmexNomad

11."To better reconnect with my father’s family in Germany. One of my cousins reached out to me and from there I felt like I had a family that actually cared about my well-being for the first time in a while. It feels like they actually 'get me' in a sense."
—BrotherSiegfried

12."I moved 5.5 years ago because there are better job opportunities in my field of music here. Also, I'm able to afford living in a nice, big city without working two to three jobs."
—monchedcookie

13."I moved from the U.S. to Austria nearly 20 years ago. I don't regret it and can't ever see myself moving back. Here, both mothers and fathers can get up to two years of paid parental leave."
Men pushing their babies in strollers on a sidewalk
—mejok

14."We recently moved to Europe for my job. Some of the benefits include lower crime in most places, inexpensive or free healthcare, inexpensive or free higher education, lower costs for cellphone and internet services, and more cultural diversity."
—spotolux

15."I moved to France 10 years ago and will never move back to the U.S. I have a better quality of life and I'm not worried my daughter will be shot by a classmate."
—jamaispeur

16."It's easy to get somewhere completely different. In America you have to travel a long way to get to a place with a different culture. In Europe, in just a few hours I can drive to France, the Netherlands, or Germany. And, in a few hours on a plane, I can be in Italy, Greece, Spain, or Portugal."

7
Not exactly the same brand that I bought but close enough:


8
I hear enough stories of the Taco's stock OEM antenna damaging the windshield while going hunting, off-roading, going through the carwash, etc., when it gets caught and then slams back against the windshield that I decided to buy this $7 antenna to replace it. So far so good  O0:




9
When you can donate $200, let me know.

NOT going to happen or will take "YEARRRSSS"...as this is how dude gets paid by the folks that own the house he lives under when he's not stealing:





 ;D ;D ;D


10

i legit own a house

 ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

Funniest sh1t I heard all day..he thinks living in someone else's "basement" and leech of them constitute home ownership... ;D ;D ;D

11
Your reading and writing comprehension are bad as well.  No wonder theking and others be roasting  your azz.  Me too but I'm not gonna go there  :2funny:

YUP.. ;D O0

12
its theking... he a PH troll clickbait copy n paste spam troll
clickbait news article

"troll" written by the neutral PH members:

hmgrock you're the biggest troll i swear... i honestly don't think your online persona is real other than to troll..

Bro HR,

I called you a negative nancy.  I also said INO is a day trade because of the volatility.  At least get your information right.

If you are here to help people, why are you the biggest troll in this forum?  In addition to being the biggest troll, you don't even understand trading. 



13
I know you don't own your house, your mom and fake nurse dose.   :2funny:

but it's ok.  You don't know how to read to comprehend either.

 ;D ;D ;D

14
it's the local PH TROLL

Says the "BIGGEST TROLL" (per the neutral PH members, their words, not mine).. ;D

And oh yeah, WELPS so much for "NO BODY CARES...no view, no comment"....and this is a "news thread" to boot... :idiot2: ;D

15
dayam fool  The article says "I" don't mean that it is him talking about himself.  He is just sharing an article.   

No wonder you sound low intelligence at most times.  How the hell can people carry on a conversation with you?  Theking, where you at?  This chit is funny as hell.  You caught him being hmong stupid again.   :2funny:

 ;D ;D ;D

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