PebHmong Discussion Forum

Life & Living => Money & Investment => Topic started by: Believe_N_Me on July 09, 2016, 01:13:10 PM

Title: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: Believe_N_Me on July 09, 2016, 01:13:10 PM
White have corporations, Jews own banking, financing and media, Indians have IT and engineering, Chinese have medical.

What fields should we have the Hmong get into in order to secure our place in this country? We can't rely on manufacturing. It isn't what it used to be. We need something that isn't in the public sector. We don't want to become like Blacks and Latinos who are so scared of losing entitlements because they need their people to stay poor in order to keep their job positions.

I've noticed a pattern when it comes to groups that achieve success in this country. They become masters in a certain industry and hold onto those positions. They become a real asset to America because of it.

There must be something that our people are masters of and do the best. Something that will be a real asset to America.
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: thePoster on July 11, 2016, 08:08:20 PM
We are not that many yet to have the few to think that far yet.
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: Believe_N_Me on July 15, 2016, 07:17:35 AM
ZDN,

The first thing that came to mind when marijuana was legalized was "this is FANTASTIC for the Hmong!"

Think of how this could build wealth for our communities. Think of how how many unemployed elders can start making serious money.

Our parents didn't have education. They had to work for very low wage jobs. Because of this they could not pass on wealth. This hurt people like us. We were always having to play catch up. Some of us struggle everyday because we are having to provide for ourselves while taking care of aging parents.

However, marijuana could change all of this.

Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: Sifu on July 15, 2016, 10:23:08 AM
The problem with medical MJ grow ops are the legal ramifications.  You're going to be under a microscope for everything you do and how you do it.  Secondly, if MJ is somehow legalized the cash cow is going to be dried when competition hits or there is over saturation of said goods and services.  I mean if I could grow my own I just grow enough for myself. If grand mom can grow it herself and sell it then there's little reason to get into it. 

High risks, high rewards.  Not worth the risks for me but the demand is obviously there for now.
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: Believe_N_Me on July 16, 2016, 08:55:51 AM
The problem with medical MJ grow ops are the legal ramifications.  You're going to be under a microscope for everything you do and how you do it.  Secondly, if MJ is somehow legalized the cash cow is going to be dried when competition hits or there is over saturation of said goods and services.  I mean if I could grow my own I just grow enough for myself. If grand mom can grow it herself and sell it then there's little reason to get into it. 

High risks, high rewards.  Not worth the risks for me but the demand is obviously there for now.

I have yet to immerse myself in this industry but I have heard that there are strict limits to how much a person can grow. I'm not worried about competition when it comes to growing MJ. The Hmong are highly knowledgable in the arena of growing these kind of plants. However, it's the business side that concerns me. We need people who are savvy, great salespeople, and good dealmakers.

We really need to redirect our people and set them up for the future. There can only be so many mom and pop grocery stores, insurance offices, home healthcare, etc. I would like to see more Hmong entrepreneurs even at the level where it doesn't take a 4-year college degree.

Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: duckwingduck on July 26, 2016, 12:44:16 AM
Ask yourself.  If you can't do it, don't put the burden on others.
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: r3b1rth on July 26, 2016, 06:34:16 AM
We all talk to much "community" and don't take action. Question is... what part are you doing? Is that your dream... to build wealth in the community? Are you giving back in some way/shape/form?

Lol... I pretty much feel the same as duckwingduck.

Worry about yourself... if that is so much as your goal, you should be thinking about how you can contribute to the community, I don't know why so many people have this grandiose ideas about building up the community in a short amount of time. This isn't a game. It's real life... so many factors... you can only worry about yourself.
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: nightrider on August 04, 2016, 07:26:23 PM
BNE,
You're mistaken about Blacks & Latino; They're hypothetically in control of the Arm Forces.

How bout ship building? Hmong can't even rise to the challenge how can Hmong people become an asset? Even now, I found so many Hmong people shopping at other stores far more than supporting their Hmong owned stores. So how can wealth be spread? It's just so fuk up. If people look at Viets, they support their own businesses, they never go to a Hmong store or a Chinese store. They keep their money flowing in their own community, why we just don't f'en care.
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: Sifu on August 05, 2016, 08:17:42 AM
I'll bite for Nightrider's post.

Let's use restaurants as an example.  The way I see it as a consumer is if they do not serve what I like to eat or the facility isn't clean then I'm going to spend money elsewhere.  There are so many shanty restaurants that are dirty, poor food prep, poor customer support, etc that Id rather eat elsewhere.  Does that mean Ill go to the cleaner restaurant?  In terms of food; absolutely. 

If you apply it to smaller cornerstone mom and pop stores they'll have what I need EXCEPT that one ingredient.  Sometimes that means I have to go to the shady, fish smelling Viet store.

If we want Hmong people to build ANYTHING within strict specifications then education is the only answer.  How do you expect Hmong to build ships, cars, appliances if they don't understand why you have to follow guidelines and the reasoning for that?  You could tell them to pull this lever, push that button and anyone can do that.  To innovate further requires some more work. 

I'm not even suggesting that it can't be done.  We are very resilient people and we just need to find a market.

In terms of farming, Hmong elders understand this better than myself so I can see how a grow op is a more viable solution; albeit with super strict regulations and what not.  The problem is one person opens a grow op, another Hmong person will open one. 

Things are improving and I agree it is difficult to see hard working people suffer but that's competition and convenience.  If you can't adjust that then there's not much you can do.  I for one will try to support local businesses but I'm a consumer who wants my product.
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: Phab Ej Dao Vue on August 05, 2016, 05:48:44 PM
Ask yourself.  If you can't do it, don't put the burden on others.

X2

We all talk to much "community" and don't take action. Question is... what part are you doing? Is that your dream... to build wealth in the community? Are you giving back in some way/shape/form?

Lol... I pretty much feel the same as duckwingduck.

Worry about yourself... if that is so much as your goal, you should be thinking about how you can contribute to the community, I don't know why so many people have this grandiose ideas about building up the community in a short amount of time. This isn't a game. It's real life... so many factors... you can only worry about yourself.

I concur.
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: nightrider on August 05, 2016, 07:19:34 PM
I'll bite for Nightrider's post.

Let's use restaurants as an example.  The way I see it as a consumer is if they do not serve what I like to eat or the facility isn't clean then I'm going to spend money elsewhere.  There are so many shanty restaurants that are dirty, poor food prep, poor customer support, etc that Id rather eat elsewhere.  Does that mean Ill go to the cleaner restaurant?  In terms of food; absolutely. 

If you apply it to smaller cornerstone mom and pop stores they'll have what I need EXCEPT that one ingredient.  Sometimes that means I have to go to the shady, fish smelling Viet store.

If we want Hmong people to build ANYTHING within strict specifications then education is the only answer.  How do you expect Hmong to build ships, cars, appliances if they don't understand why you have to follow guidelines and the reasoning for that?  You could tell them to pull this lever, push that button and anyone can do that.  To innovate further requires some more work. 

I'm not even suggesting that it can't be done.  We are very resilient people and we just need to find a market.

In terms of farming, Hmong elders understand this better than myself so I can see how a grow op is a more viable solution; albeit with super strict regulations and what not.  The problem is one person opens a grow op, another Hmong person will open one. 

Things are improving and I agree it is difficult to see hard working people suffer but that's competition and convenience.  If you can't adjust that then there's not much you can do.  I for one will try to support local businesses but I'm a consumer who wants my product.

I agree with everything what you just said but what I don't understand is why Viets don't share our thoughts? They absolute support their community 100% whether their mom & pop stores is good or bad, have it or not have what they need. This is something I'm envious of them, even though they may have loss their country, they're all extremely cooperative with each other. Unlike us "mongolians".
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: Believe_N_Me on September 15, 2016, 11:11:23 PM
I have serious cash to burn and am willing to invest in serious, passionate Hmong entrepreneurs. I am not necessarily looking to run the business but am willing to invest in those who are innovative and willing to work hard.

I am even willing to partner up with other serious investors - that is if there are any.

Some of you are simply thinking too small and fail to see the big picture.

I am willing to start profitable businesses and hire Hmong to manage them.

 
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: bulbasaur on September 15, 2016, 11:25:39 PM
You're gonna need more than 9 cents to invest.  Two nickels is already too much for you.   :2funny:
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: YAX on October 04, 2016, 01:19:42 AM
investing in Hmong communities generally equals how much can you conn out of your dumb Hmong brother.  Look at all those herbal med stands.  Right now, someone is selling a cure for cancer or a can of shampoo that can regrow hair.  Someone else is selling an MLM or a new pyrmid scam. They rip off Hmong people because Hmongs are so ignorant.  Go get an education first, then you can prevent yourself from monetary lost and start to grow wealth.
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: DuMa on October 04, 2016, 03:39:47 AM
Hmongs are already good at throwing parties.  Like 20 events for new years? No other nation can top that. 

It was once universally known that Thursday night is azn night but at hmong central, its hmong night out.  I didn't live for the weekend.  I lived for thursday.  Oh the blur memories. 
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: YAX on October 04, 2016, 10:12:51 PM
hey, those parties are good for the community.
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: zena on October 05, 2016, 11:48:41 AM
Why separate the races?  It's a mix of everyone.  Given the availability of a good education and freedom, anything is possible for anyone.  And, why only fund Hmong things?  Fund what you are passionate about that isn't related to culture or race.  You might open doors to greater things.
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: VaajMoob on October 21, 2016, 07:45:07 PM
hmong people are chicken coops and marijuana. maybe that's a start?
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: Believe_N_Me on November 29, 2016, 03:35:44 AM
You're gonna need more than 9 cents to invest.  Two nickels is already too much for you.   :2funny:

That's 9 cents more than you.  :2funny:
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: w1s3m0n on December 28, 2016, 03:02:08 PM
Hmong culture is very secretive about relevant talents and skills because we only want to pass it down to our family.  Until our culture overcome this barrier we cannot make the great leap.  Think about HND.  The topics of discussion is about going to college and succeeding in college.  Where is the HND for Hmong professionals and entrepreneurs?  There is not and there won't be one because the barrier is our culture.  Why should store A share its secret of monetizing openly so store B can equalize the playing field?  Store A will not.  This is the traditional predicament within game theory.  How do we overcome our self interest, per Adam Smith, and move towards the self and group per John Nash?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: nooneever on January 16, 2017, 11:14:28 AM
How about hemp farming?  I see a lot of growth potential in this, and it is using a skill which most of us, or rather our parents, are familiar with (farming).
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: lilly on August 13, 2019, 10:06:46 PM
This thread is old but I want to share my thoughts.

I, too, am envious of the groups of people that can really stick together and support each other, because they share a common goal.  Groups like the Jews and the Viets.

I am particularly awed by the Jews' early foresight and game plan.  They got in early and niched themselves in the banking and film industries.  They saw that controlling the banking and film industries was going to be the most effective way of building wealth and securing a better and more prosperous future for their people.  Once they established themselves in those industries, they used their successes to the betterment of their people: they lent money to only other fellow Jews at low rates and helped out their fellow struggling Jews by being there for each other, etc.  This is why the Jews are so rich and successful today.  They supported each other and built each other up post-Holocaust.

I wish Hmong people had this same mindset: to work together for the betterment of our people; those that have wealth would lend at low interest rates to other fellow Hmongs; lift and support each other toward a common goal of seeing the Hmong people as a whole reach success and wealth.  Unfortunately, we are not like that.  Everyone is for themselves.  But, we also didn't go through what the Jews went through as a people.  They endured the Holocaust and countless other hardships and struggles as a people, which bound them more tightly together toward a common goal: to never be in a vulnerable position again and allow other people to mistreat them.  They understood that money was power.

Anyway, it was asked What is the one thing that Hmong people can take ownership of and claim that we are good at?  The first thing that comes to mind is farming.  Our parents were farmers and were great at farming.  People in our generation still have the affinity for farming if we applied ourselves because most of us inherited that farming know-how from our parents.  Now, whether farming is a viable field for us to get into and make it as the thing that we are known for, I don't know the answer to that.  We are organic farmers, not commercial farmers.  But there is big money to be made in organic food, so that can be an area that we can explore further if we wanted to.  We already have the affinity, we just need to arm ourselves with the tools, skills, and knowledge to make it sustainable and profitable long-term.  So, whaddaya say, my fellow Hmong people?  Should we come together as a people toward the common goal of ensuring the future wealth and success of our people and our children?  Shall we start by buying land and starting organic farms?  Once we acquire wealth from organic farming, shall we commit to lending at low rates to only our fellow Hmongs, and shall we commit to helping each other the way the Jews did for one another?
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: Believe_N_Me on September 05, 2019, 05:46:21 AM
^^^

You seem to be the only one who truly understood the nature of my question. For a long time the Jews did not have a country of their own either. Yet, wherever they went they seemed to do well for themselves. They were able to create a real sense of community for themselves and operate as if they were their own country. Sometimes they didn't have a choice due to discrimination against them. The early Chinese in America followed the same suit when discriminatory laws and practices kept them out of mainstream society. They also found a niche market, established their own lending practices, gave themselves job opportunities, etc. The Hmong are not doing this enough or at the very least not quickly enough. We seem to keep looking to the government or white people to do this for us. We are making the same mistakes as blacks in America.

We vote for political candidates who promise to be that conduit to government services instead of candidates who will deregulate so that it's easier for us to work for ourselves. When Chinese, Jews, and East Indians speak of discrimination in America, they are talking about practices that target their businesses and their leadership. They aren't exactly asking for white people to give them an opportunity but rather for white people to get out of their way. When we, blacks, and Hispanics speak about discrimination, we are asking for white people to help us and include us into their fold. We may think that we are leaders of our own group, but much of that is funded by anybody else but our own group.

Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: hmgROCK on September 09, 2019, 09:02:31 AM
^^^

Relax man
Hmong folk only been here since the 70s
Still are in the first generation if you donít count the OG
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: VillainousHero on September 10, 2019, 07:59:52 AM
To build wealth...one has to be willing to do evil and good...problem is evil does evil and good does good.  That's never going to balance out in the dog eat dog world.  It takes someone who can do it...others to support it.
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: hmgROCK on September 10, 2019, 10:37:55 PM
To build wealth...one has to be willing to do evil and good...problem is evil does evil and good does good.  That's never going to balance out in the dog eat dog world.  It takes someone who can do it...others to support it.

Its our capitalist system
Winner gets all the money
Gotta stomp people to get on top
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: theking on September 10, 2019, 10:50:13 PM
Its our capitalist system
Winner gets all the money
Gotta stomp people to get on top

Not really...If you're the "hmong Nostradamus and is always right", you could just easily win the lotto and "get on top"...No?  ???
Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: nightrider on September 19, 2019, 08:29:33 PM
White have corporations, Jews own banking, financing and media, Indians have IT and engineering, Chinese have medical.

What fields should we have the Hmong get into in order to secure our place in this country? We can't rely on manufacturing. It isn't what it used to be. We need something that isn't in the public sector. We don't want to become like Blacks and Latinos who are so scared of losing entitlements because they need their people to stay poor in order to keep their job positions.

I've noticed a pattern when it comes to groups that achieve success in this country. They become masters in a certain industry and hold onto those positions. They become a real asset to America because of it.

There must be something that our people are masters of and do the best. Something that will be a real asset to America.

Sex and drugs?  :2funny:

Be realistic, no one is rich enough to pump money into a certain specialized production or service exclusively Hmong know how...

Title: Re: So seriously, how are we building wealth in our communities?
Post by: VillainousHero on October 02, 2019, 04:57:01 PM
Its our capitalist system
Winner gets all the money
Gotta stomp people to get on top
That's not exactly right.  For example you have these government appropriated funds that must be used or lose.  Guess who uses them?  The NPO's.  They use it as in being helpful to the community right?  People earning higher wages and compensations than most for profit business owners.  Here we have a system that awards people for using these programs...it may appear helpful in the propaganda it promotes, but who is really paying for all of that.  All the other people who are out there working and paying taxes so a few people can live a comfortable life...no they actually live somewhat an extravagant life and are nominated as community leaders and such.  Just saying this as the dichotomy of good and evil all in one package.

At the same time you have philanthropist s with their charitable donations...wr itten in the gift for the contract and requirement to help the poor and needy.  These philanthropist s may not be the experts in getting their charity to the poor so they look for just a program manager or project manager who expedite this process for them.  What exactly happens again is the good and evil dichotomy.  Well those charitable gifts are then used up and then now reported back to the philanthropist s.  So there were (for example only) about 50% of the money got used up, out of the dictations of the stipulations for the charity donation.  What a shame...it's spent.  Now what?

See how easily fraud, embezzlement, theft can happen.  Good and Evil all in one package.  And it's all in perspective.  How is one's moral and ethics aligned.  With today's society of the self-entitled first attitude is the norm.  You can't just tell someone that's wrong.  They turn around and say back...it's wrong to leave the unclaimed $$$$. 

When you asked someone for donation.  They turn around and say back, that they're also looking for donation.  The self-entitled people of today.  They cannot just say, I decline respectfully.  They have to say it such a sarcastic witty method.