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Author Topic: Hmong Ghost Stories  (Read 944799 times)

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Offline saki saki

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3540 on: July 05, 2012, 03:59:26 PM »
Republic,
I so aware of these two places. I'm not gonna repeat my story but if you get to my stories you'll run into my events on that park. As for Mt. Airy that place has a lot of stuff that can't be explain.

The last house before My OG's bought a house was by far the strangest stuff. Like when I started to go to church and would stay up late read'n the good book of the Lord, I would have nightmares and the Devil himself would come pick fights with me and tell'n me how well my faith is to god and he would ask me to go to the basement and test my faith. but being a chicken I never went down there to challenge him.



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Offline saki saki

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3541 on: July 05, 2012, 04:10:50 PM »
Republic,
All your stories are well edited and prep, That's what I expect from a collage grad. Please go on with more of your spooky stories.
It seems to me that you were once a naughty dude who got lost in the mix of life then found GOD and turn your life around. Am I right?



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Offline SuperFly

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3542 on: July 05, 2012, 05:46:43 PM »
Just a commentary on grammar and syntax:

I just have to say - DAYEEM!  I'm on page 140-something and I have to say some of you people are absolutely unreadable!  I don't mean to be the grammar Nazi but come on people! 

IF you were not born in this country, I am not talking to you.  English is truly your second language and you do the best that you can.

BUT if you were born in this country OR IF you grew up in this country...REAL LY?  Throw in a comma or a period every once in awhile.  It makes a big difference.  Also, paragraphs are good too.  By no means am I asking for perfection.  This is an informal message forum not an English class.  But if people are here, they want to read your story.  At least make it easier for people to understand what you're trying to say.  I wasn't born in this country AND I'm retarded.  If I can put a proper sentence together so can you.

One final note then I'm done:  Ebonics make stories funny and NOT scary.  If something is "little," then please for the love of God type "little" or "small" or "tiny" or "miniscule" or whatever.  Do NOT call it "lilo."  I read a story that might have been pretty spooky but-for the half dozen or so uses of the adjective "lilo!"  This made me chuckle so much that the story completely lost it's ability to scare me.

I am sure you've offended some, but then again... we're Hmong and many of the people reading and writing are doing it from their phones or iPads (not me though).  Just saying....



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Offline SuperFly

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3543 on: July 05, 2012, 06:37:49 PM »
My brothers said that Mt. Airy homes were built on grounds that used to be a graveyard for fallen Native Americans.  My cousin that lived there used to tell us that when him and his siblings were young and able to see things, they used to go out and play tag at night.  They would see huge shadowy figures that looked as though they were riding horses.  Or they'd see the "Headless Horseman."  And late at night, they'd hear faint voices of Native Americans singing and chanting.

Does anyone know about the tallest hill in Mt. Airy?  That area was where a young Hmong boy shot and killed himself because he stole from the Hmong store on Jackson Street (store right next to Mt. Airy).  The owners caught him stealing and they were going to call the cops and he had begged them not to because he didn't fear anything except for his dad (who at the time was an abusive father).  As they were dialing for the cops, the boy ran out the door and with his dad's gun in his hand, he went to the top of the hill (it's all fenced up now) and shot himself.  To this day, late at night kids can hear someone crying from that particular area.  It has always been known as a cold spot as well.



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Offline SuperFly

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3544 on: July 05, 2012, 07:15:09 PM »
My aunt who co-owned a funeral home used to have the spirits following her home at night.  Her and my uncle are tough.  They never talk about those things that go "bump" in the night.  They don't believe in it either.  They say once it's dead, it's really dead.  There's nothing more to it.  I'm sure they've experienced enough frightening things, but they don't share it with anyone.  But my aunt has mentioned a thing or two to my mom. 

My aunt said that when she goes home after running the funeral home, she goes paranoid because she would hear voices.  Voices that constantly ask her about why they're dead or where's their family, etc.  The voices would carry on even when she's trying to sleep in her bed at home.  She tries to ignore them as much as possible, but they just keep talking to her.  There were many that tried to possess her as well. 

She has converted herself to Christianity now.  She reads the bible daily and her prayers have successfully kept the spirits away from her.  The voices she hears have faded away.  My uncle is too stubborn to convert, though.  And half of the family refuses to convert.  So for some people, they find hope in God.  And that was what she was missing for a very long time.  My mom said that my aunt has gone Church-crazy because she is so deeply devoted that she spends every day in Church whether it be Hmong or Meka churches. 

So there is some good in our traditional religion and some good in other religions.



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Offline Republic

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3545 on: July 05, 2012, 07:36:52 PM »
Republic,
All your stories are well edited and prep, That's what I expect from a collage grad. Please go on with more of your spooky stories.
It seems to me that you were once a naughty dude who got lost in the mix of life then found GOD and turn your life around. Am I right?

I was never a thug or a gangster if that's what you mean.  I did have my share of fun though, mostly revolving around girls and what guys do to have fun.  I always had tremendous respect for my parents and mostly just concentrated on school, so in that respect I was never naughty.  However, finding Christ has been a wonderful blessing in my life.



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Offline Republic

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3546 on: July 05, 2012, 07:42:34 PM »
Before I lived in St. Paul, I was dating a girl there.  During one visit, we wanted to be alone so we went to Mound's Park.  We found a secluded spot close to sunset just to be alone.  Then out of nowhere, we both heard drums.  It wasn't like the Hmong funeral drums.  It sounded exactly like the Native American Indian drums out of the movies.  It was really faint, but we both heard it.  It went on for a long time, then it was kind of funny.  An Indian family (Indian from the country India) walked by on one of the trails and the drumming stopped.  We both got a little spooked so we got up and walked out behind them.



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Offline Republic

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3547 on: July 05, 2012, 08:18:31 PM »
Poj Ntxoog

Ever since I was a kid I wondered about the Hmong Poj Ntxoog.  As Hmong kids, we all heard the spooky stories from the adults.  Some probably even used threats of the Poj Ntxoog to scare us as kids into not wandering away during a fishing or camping trip.  As a young man, I wondered if maybe this creature was just some kind of new, yet undiscovered monkey.  The typical description of the Poj Ntxoog is that it is small with long white hair, sometimes long black hair.  It looks human and has fierce teeth and sometimes claws.  To me, that sounds like an animal.  But now as an adult, I cannot discount that this creature reeks more of the demonic than the natural. 

One time while chatting with my mom, we started talking about the supernatural.  She usually does not open up about it because I think my mom is able to see things from time to time and it scares her.  On this occasion, my mom told us that when she was a young girl, her cousin was taken by a Poj Ntxoog.  She said an uncle was going out to gather firewood.  He didn't want to enter the jungle alone, so he took his little niece with him.  She was only about 5 or 6 at the time.  They didn't go far into the jungle, but they were off of the main trail.  He began cutting wood as the little girl played nearby.  After some time, he realized she wasn't humming to herself anymore.  He looked around and panicked.  He looked up and in the tree was a white creature with long flowing white hair jumping away on the branches.  At that moment, he heard faint voices.  He ran towards the trail and saw a small group of Hmong people walking along the trail.  He begged them for help.  They spread out and looked for the little girl but found nothing.  He ran back to my mom's village and the adults went out to search.  Nothing.  They had someone saib and that shaman said the little girl was taken by that white Poj Ntxoog. 

Another time, I was travelling with my dad and two other men to Washington DC.  My dad and those two men had been soldiers during the war and they were all going to DC to take part in one of the gatherings they used to stage to garner support for the Lao Veteren's Naturalization Act.  It was great to be able to go and just listen to them recount war stories.  We drove all through the night to arrive in DC the following morning.  Late in the night, the war stories waned and the subject turned to ghost stories.  They all had scary stories to share but this is the one that I remember about a Poj Ntxoog.

I asked the men if they thought there was anything to the Poj Ntxoog stories.  They all said yes.  Then I said asked them if any of them had ever seen a Poj Ntxoog.  Cha got really serious and he said he had (his name is not really Cha but for this story that's what we'll call him).  Cha said that when he was a boy, he was playing hide and seek with his cousins.  None of them were older than 10 or 11, so they played near a house which was right by the entry to the jungle.  The kids were laughing and running around just doing what kids do.  Then an old man that lived in the house came out and told them to keep it down.  Cha said there was a kawm (one of those big woven baskets worn like a backpack to carry firewood and other stuff in) leaning against the side of the house with a piece of cloth covering the top.  The old man laughed and told the kids to keep it down as he leaned over to pick up the kawm.  Suddenly, as he removed the cloth, a little white monkey-like thing jumped out.  It had long white hair and red eyes.  It bit the old man's hand then it screamed as it jumped away into the jungle.  The kids stood in shock for a minute then they all ran away including Cha.  Cha said he went and told his dad.  Cha's dad and several other men came running to the old man's house.  The found him.  He was ok, but he had a bloody bite mark on his hand.  Cha said the old man got really sick and nearly died but they did some kind of shaman blessings on him to save him.



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Offline saki saki

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3548 on: July 05, 2012, 11:30:55 PM »
My brothers said that Mt. Airy homes were built on grounds that used to be a graveyard for fallen Native Americans.  My cousin that lived there used to tell us that when him and his siblings were young and able to see things, they used to go out and play tag at night.  They would see huge shadowy figures that looked as though they were riding horses.  Or they'd see the "Headless Horseman."  And late at night, they'd hear faint voices of Native Americans singing and chanting.

Does anyone know about the tallest hill in Mt. Airy?  That area was where a young Hmong boy shot and killed himself because he stole from the Hmong store on Jackson Street (store right next to Mt. Airy).  The owners caught him stealing and they were going to call the cops and he had begged them not to because he didn't fear anything except for his dad (who at the time was an abusive father).  As they were dialing for the cops, the boy ran out the door and with his dad's gun in his hand, he went to the top of the hill (it's all fenced up now) and shot himself.  To this day, late at night kids can hear someone crying from that particular area.  It has always been known as a cold spot as well.
which hill is tat? On arch street or tat one street on the otherside of the mt. Airy?i haven't drive'n there since 10+ yrs ago. And when you mention fence up,  is tat by that hi way on penn and rice street?
 Or by franklin elem. Now you got me wonder'n.



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Offline saki saki

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3549 on: July 05, 2012, 11:34:32 PM »
If ur talk'n about a fence up, i remember tat there was a hmng kid tat got ran over on tat street. Therfore it go fence up to keep kids outta there. Cuz b 4 there was never a fence, cuz i go catch lizards there. Fast littler bugger too. Rite by the wall. And i use to go up the side of the hill and pick rasberry , there was a tree and. I would sit under and pick anf eat it all day.



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Offline iCOP

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3550 on: July 06, 2012, 08:05:23 AM »
If ur talk'n about a fence up, i remember tat there was a hmng kid tat got ran over on tat street. Therfore it go fence up to keep kids outta there. Cuz b 4 there was never a fence, cuz i go catch lizards there. Fast littler bugger too. Rite by the wall. And i use to go up the side of the hill and pick rasberry , there was a tree and. I would sit under and pick anf eat it all day.

I have no idea what you just posted.



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Offline saki saki

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3551 on: July 06, 2012, 06:54:14 PM »
I have no idea what you just posted.
lol my bad. ;D if you go down tat hi way toward 35w east N west. Just before you drive past the side of Mt. Airy to the rite there's a small retain'n wall. If you don't look for it you could of pass it before you even know it. A bit better? ;D



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Offline realism

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3552 on: July 07, 2012, 12:54:41 AM »



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Offline Republic

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3553 on: July 07, 2012, 02:06:52 AM »
That looks like it to me.



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Offline Republic

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3554 on: July 07, 2012, 03:30:25 PM »
Hmong Black Magic

Khawv koob is the name for Hmong Black Magic.  We have probably all heard of someone in our family who dabbled in black magic.  My family is no different.  When I was younger, my dad told me about an uncle who refused to come to America.  My dad said this uncle was very powerful with black magic and could do a number of things that puzzled the mind.  To family members, he was kind, loving, and generous.  However, my dad said he was feared by outsiders.  In Laos, he supposedly used his black magic to get revenge on many people he considered enemies.  The danger though is that anyone who dares to use black magic must eventually pay a price for that power. 

Before the war, my uncle decided that he wanted to start giving up his black magic powers.  A missionary had come to his village and taught about the love of Jesus Christ.  My uncle was very intrigued and began listening and learning more.  Very quickly, he accepted Christ and he brought his entire family to Christ. 

My uncle's black magic demons were not pleased.  Because my uncle's faith was new and not very firm yet, the demons were able to exact vengence on his family for converting to Christianity.  Three of his children died within a couple of years due to various illnesses.  Their deaths were hard on the man.  He became very angry and embittered.  Rather than hold firm to his faith, my uncle returned to the old ways and continued to practice his black magic. 

Years later, Laos fell and my uncle and his remaining family fled to Thailand.  There, he refused to come to America.  He was content to stay in the camps.  In the mid-90s, my parents returned to Thailand and visited the camps.  My dad said he had a wonderful visit with my uncle.  He was still as kind and welcoming to my dad as he had ever been.  However, two years after my dad's visit, my uncle began seeing things.  Apparently, his demons began betraying him.  Other demons that were kept at bay were now haunting his dreams.  At night, he would see shadows and visions of horrific things.  Dark children dressed in Hmong clothing would come to him at night asking for food.  My cousin arranged for a shaman to come heal my uncle.  However, nothing worked. 

One day, my uncle believed that a demon was inside of him and he needed to get it out.  When no one was around, he took a very sharp Hmong knife and he cut his own stomach open from one side to the other.  When my cousin came home, he was laying on the dirt floor in a pool of his own blood, barely alive, but with all of his intestines strewn about him.  My cousin kneeled down and held him.  He whispered a few things that were incoherent.  Then he died in my cousin's arms. 

Most of his children had come to America over the years.  After his death, the ones who still believed in the old ways, had terrible dreams about him and his demons.  The ones who were Christians didn't dream about anything. 

Someone posted earlier in this thread that maybe Hmong black magic only effected those who believed in the old ways.  I think there is something to this.  My dad was a military officer during the war.  He said that there were Hmong soldiers who could do black magic who would get upset at American CIA officers.  As a result, they tried to use their demons to attack the Americans but nothing happened. 

I have an aunt who is a learned shaman.  She is crazy.  From time to time she will get possessed by her demons and do and say crazy things.  When her favorite daughter graduated from college, the daughter got engaged to a white guy.  My aunt flipped out.  That's when her demonization began.  She was so desperate to save her daughter from marrying a white man that she went to a master of black magic and paid her thousands of dollars to send a demon to break them up.  Nothing.  That white guy is a Christian and so is her daughter.  Today, they actually have a very good marriage and are both very successful.  The family believes however that those demons kind of bounced back and made her crazier because of what she tried to do.  It's kind of sad. 

I guess the moral of the story is don't mess with Hmong black magic.  It's bad for your mental health.



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