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Author Topic: Hmong Ghost Stories  (Read 538532 times)

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Offline thehotone

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3540 on: July 05, 2012, 07:59:49 AM »
republic, your last story is  :2funny:. sounds like a scare tactic to get pple to convert. anyone who is deeply religious would find the root of their problem in their own religion before crossing over to the other religion. for an example, your uncle or brother would've seek a shaman to see what is wrong first and things that you describle your bro in law going thru does not go away in saying one verse. anyhow, this is a ghost story thread so ....but thanks for sharing!  :)



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Offline Republic

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3541 on: July 05, 2012, 10:15:58 AM »
republic, your last story is  :2funny:. sounds like a scare tactic to get pple to convert. anyone who is deeply religious would find the root of their problem in their own religion before crossing over to the other religion. for an example, your uncle or brother would've seek a shaman to see what is wrong first and things that you describle your bro in law going thru does not go away in saying one verse. anyhow, this is a ghost story thread so ....but thanks for sharing!  :)

If someone were to be scared enough to convert because of the story, I wouldn't mind.  But it's all true.  It all happened so fast.  The father called on God on the second day when the smell hit him.  Because that made it go away, he saw no need to call a shaman.  The church went to his house a couple of weekends later and prayed for them.  Then the elders removed his shaman fetishes. 

Unfortunately, wherever there are large Hmong communities, demonic possession and demonization tends to run rampant.  As long as there are Hmong people, shamans and pastors will remain busy. 



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Offline thehotone

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3542 on: July 05, 2012, 10:36:09 AM »
true and thank you for acknowledging the fact that it doesn't matter if you're christian or not, paranormal things are part of our culture and these kind of things tend to happen more b/c we Hmong are sensitive to these energies.



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Offline Republic

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3543 on: July 05, 2012, 10:49:54 AM »
Haunted Fishing Spot

Where I grew up there was a creek that Hmong people loved to fish.  It was secluded and beautiful.  It was a little noisey though because it was underneath a flow-over dam.  The dam had 3 levels.  The lowest level had a section of the dam removed so water could flow fast and free.  When I was a kid, there were no houses surrounding this dam.  It was all woods.  When my uncles first came to America, I can still remember that we would go out there and fish until dark without anyone bothering us.  Sometimes we would camp overnight.  As a kid, I never remembered seeing or hearing anything personally.  However, the adults aways talked about hearing voices or seeing shadows move in the woods.

During the first half of the 20th century, it was rumored that the woods surrounding that dam was used as a dumping ground for hit victims by Chicagoland mobsters.  Also, the highest part of the flow-over damn was at such an angle that white people would use it as a water slide.  Every so often some dumb white kid would go into the water wrong and knock himself out then drown.  Over the years, we saw emergency workers pull two bodies out of that creek.

One time some friends went fishing there.  The oldest was only 16.  He had just gotten his driver's license and he wanted to take a bunch of his little cousins and his brother out to fish at that creek.  The little brother was catfishing when his line snagged something heavy.  It didn't pull back on his line so he just assumed it was a rock or a log.  But when he pulled, the weight slowly came.  When the weight surfaced, it was a dead body.  The poor kid threw his pole in the water and ran.  When he told his brother and cousins, they all took off!  They weren't supposed to go fishing without an adult so they never did tell their parents.  They told me and my brothers about it years later. 

Another time, a Hmong guy and his wife went to that creek late in the afternoon along with a friend and his wife.  Their plan was simple:  stay late into the night and cast their net for fish.  Nevermind that netting was illegal there.  Haha I love my Hmong people.  As soon as it started to get dark, they began netting.  It was a good night and they were getting lots of fish.  They had a couple of those 5 gallon buckets each and those were filling up nicely with good eating sized fish.  Around 10pm, everyone got tired except for the Hmong guy.  His wife and the other couple were on land just casually fishing with rod and reel.  But the Hmong guy was still casting his net.  Suddenly, a light flashed.  They all got scared thinking it was a ranger.  The Hmong guy was especially scared because he was still netting.  Instinctively, he dropped his net and ducked under the water.  The others were astonished by wait they saw.  They said they saw a ball of white light just hover over the water.  It went to the spot where the Hmong guy went under.  It hovered a second or two, then it just vanished.  When the Hmong guy came up, it was dark again. 

They quickly packed their gear and went home.  When they got home, they got the news that my aunt had been in a car accident and died.  When he got the news. the poor guy sat down at his dining table and wept openly for the longest time.  That Hmong guy was an orphan.  He came to America as a teenager and for a time, my uncle and aunt took him in.  My aunt loved him like a son and he treated her like a mother.  I'm not sure if the light was her coming to say good-bye to him or if it was something else.  But it was all very strange. 



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Offline Republic

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3544 on: July 05, 2012, 11:10:06 AM »
true and thank you for acknowledging the fact that it doesn't matter if you're christian or not, paranormal things are part of our culture and these kind of things tend to happen more b/c we Hmong are sensitive to these energies.

I tend to believe that those who experience the paranormal, do so for one of two reasons:  1) they actively seek out the paranormal or 2) they have a direct ancestor who actively sought it out.  The Bible teaches that idolatry (the worship of anything other than God) can effect your descendants for as many as three or four generations!  This certainly falls in line with the Hmong belief that the most powerful shamans are the chosen shamans (dab thawj).  These are shamans who are believed to be empowered by a demon that remains with that familial bloodline revisiting one family member after another for many generations.  As Hmong people, this makes sense to us.  We all know of a family OR two OR three that just seems to have more strange, paranormal things happen to them than anyone else.  I believe this is the reason. 

Whether we are Christians or not, if we looked closely enough at our ancestors just 3 or 4 generations back, most of us can find someone in our direct line who dabbled in the supernatural.  For example, for me, my parents never messed with any of that stuff.  However, my grandfather had incredible and strange abilities.  He was a master crafter of the traditional Hmong qheej.  People came from all over Laos just to purchase an instrument from him.  He knew how to hu plig.  He knew how to saib.  I believe now that it was because of my grandfather, that as a kid I was always fascinated with reading stories about the supernatural.  And while, I have no abilities to sense ghosts or spirits, I have many first cousins who do have strange residual abilities, probably due to my grandfather. 



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Offline Republic

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3545 on: July 05, 2012, 11:28:06 AM »
Where are My Keys?

For 3 years, my wife and I lived in St. Paul.  We had just bought our first home in Oakdale.  Minnesota people know.  Anyways, we had only been living there for a few weeks so everything was still very new.  This was also prior to me really understanding the Word of God and being strong in my faith.  Thus, I was a little uneasy with the new place.  One of my great fears as a kid was moving into a truly haunted house!  HAHA, not sure why but that used to worry me. 

Nothing strange had happened.  But I was still cautious nontheless.  One night, my wife picked me up from my office (We were operating on one car at the time).  We stopped at the grocery store.  Then we came home.  I was carrying our son in his carseat along with several bags of groceries.  So I gave her my keys to unlock the door.  We came inside and put my son to bed then we put all of the groceries away.  That was when I noticed that I didn't have my keys. 

"Honey, where are my keys?"

"I put them on the counter," she replied.

They were not on the counter.  We tore the house apart looking for them.  For an hour we looked.  Then I remembered something I read about ghosts.  One clear sign of a ghost is if things go missing unexpectedly, then turn up again in places you know you did not leave it.  I started to get goosebumps.  Suddenly, the room got really cold.  The ONLY thing I could think of was to go back to my office and look for my keys.  I KNEW my keys weren't there.  But I was so agitated and a little frightened that my keys could be swiped by a ghostly entity like that.  I had to do something.

I got dressed and grabbed my wife's keys.  I went to open the door and - FOOK - my keys were hanging in the key hole.  My scatter brained wife had left my keys in the doorknob.  And then I realized that the room had gotten cold because it was Minnesota and it was late fall and we didn't turn the heat on when we first got home. 

Sometimes, you don't need a zebra to explain the hoofprints if there are plenty of horses around.



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Offline Republic

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3546 on: July 05, 2012, 11:51:48 AM »
Mt. Airy and Mounds Park

Any Minnesota people know about these places?  Supposedly both are hotbeds for ghostly activity.

I have a cousin and his wife who lived with me for a few months in St. Paul.  They had just started jobs there and needed a place to stay until they found a home.  His wife was very nice and very chatty.  She told us that when her family first moved to St. Paul from California, they lived in some housing located in Mt. Airy with a lot of other Hmong people.  One day, she was doing her make-up and getting ready to go do something.  When she finished, she came downstairs.  As she got to the bottom of the stairs she noticed that the TV was on and a man was laying on the couch watching TV.  She just assumed it was her dad.  Casually, she said, "Bye dad, I'm going out."  No answer.  As soon as she stepped outside, her parents were both already outside.  None of her siblings were home.  Like a girl, she said she squeeled then screamed.  HAHA, she tried to recreate the squeel when she told us the story.  It was funny.  She told her dad someone was in the house so he ran inside.  He looked all over but he didn't find anyone. 

My brother-in-law's dad used to be a cop in St. Paul.  One night while he was patrolling during his regular night shift, he went by Mounds Park.  It was past midnight.  But he noticed some kids running across the field.  He flashed his lights and chased them down.  There were four of them and they were all Hmong.  He was a little suprised that they didn't split up when running across the field but when he stopped them, he said they looked terrified.  When the kids finally calmed down enough they told him that they went into the park to drink and hangout.  After awhile, they noticed something hanging off of a tree limb that wasn't there before.  It looked like a body was hanging by the neck and it was writhing and twisting like it was still alive.  They said it wasn't there when they first got there so it scared them and they ran.  When the cop's backup arrived, some officers along with a K-9 unit went into the area the kids said they had seen the person hanging from the tree.  The cops found nothing though. 



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Offline Republic

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3547 on: July 05, 2012, 12:04:16 PM »
Hmong Demons and an American Friend

I have an American friend who was a part of a Christian group that sent aid and supplies to the Hmong refugee camps during the 80s and early 90s.  He volunteered to go over personally and help provide relief to Hmong refugees.  They gave people food and medicines.  Then when possible, they shared the Word of God. 

In the camps, he said he saw Hmong people practicing shamanism everywhere.  As a result, he saw strange things and heard about even stranger things.  The scariest thing he saw however ocurred out of the blue.

One day, he had been helping with food prep or something.  He wanted to deliver food to an old lady who had been sick.  She didn't have any real family in the camp so he felt bad for her.  He went to her hut and opened the door.  The old lady was laying on the bed.  But there was someone else with her.  His back was turned and he was kind of hunched over.  He said "Hello."  Then that person turned his head.  My friend said what he saw was demonic.  The demon had a hideous face and a long tongue.  It smiled at my friend.  My friend was scared.  But he gathered his wits.  He closed his eyes and prayed for God to remove that thing.  When he opened his eyes, the demon was gone.  Sometime later, that old woman died.



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Offline saki saki

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3548 on: July 05, 2012, 03:59:26 PM »
Republic,
I so aware of these two places. I'm not gonna repeat my story but if you get to my stories you'll run into my events on that park. As for Mt. Airy that place has a lot of stuff that can't be explain.

The last house before My OG's bought a house was by far the strangest stuff. Like when I started to go to church and would stay up late read'n the good book of the Lord, I would have nightmares and the Devil himself would come pick fights with me and tell'n me how well my faith is to god and he would ask me to go to the basement and test my faith. but being a chicken I never went down there to challenge him.



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Offline saki saki

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3549 on: July 05, 2012, 04:10:50 PM »
Republic,
All your stories are well edited and prep, That's what I expect from a collage grad. Please go on with more of your spooky stories.
It seems to me that you were once a naughty dude who got lost in the mix of life then found GOD and turn your life around. Am I right?



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Offline SuperFly

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3550 on: July 05, 2012, 05:46:43 PM »
Just a commentary on grammar and syntax:

I just have to say - DAYEEM!  I'm on page 140-something and I have to say some of you people are absolutely unreadable!  I don't mean to be the grammar Nazi but come on people! 

IF you were not born in this country, I am not talking to you.  English is truly your second language and you do the best that you can.

BUT if you were born in this country OR IF you grew up in this country...REAL LY?  Throw in a comma or a period every once in awhile.  It makes a big difference.  Also, paragraphs are good too.  By no means am I asking for perfection.  This is an informal message forum not an English class.  But if people are here, they want to read your story.  At least make it easier for people to understand what you're trying to say.  I wasn't born in this country AND I'm retarded.  If I can put a proper sentence together so can you.

One final note then I'm done:  Ebonics make stories funny and NOT scary.  If something is "little," then please for the love of God type "little" or "small" or "tiny" or "miniscule" or whatever.  Do NOT call it "lilo."  I read a story that might have been pretty spooky but-for the half dozen or so uses of the adjective "lilo!"  This made me chuckle so much that the story completely lost it's ability to scare me.

I am sure you've offended some, but then again... we're Hmong and many of the people reading and writing are doing it from their phones or iPads (not me though).  Just saying....



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Offline SuperFly

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3551 on: July 05, 2012, 06:37:49 PM »
My brothers said that Mt. Airy homes were built on grounds that used to be a graveyard for fallen Native Americans.  My cousin that lived there used to tell us that when him and his siblings were young and able to see things, they used to go out and play tag at night.  They would see huge shadowy figures that looked as though they were riding horses.  Or they'd see the "Headless Horseman."  And late at night, they'd hear faint voices of Native Americans singing and chanting.

Does anyone know about the tallest hill in Mt. Airy?  That area was where a young Hmong boy shot and killed himself because he stole from the Hmong store on Jackson Street (store right next to Mt. Airy).  The owners caught him stealing and they were going to call the cops and he had begged them not to because he didn't fear anything except for his dad (who at the time was an abusive father).  As they were dialing for the cops, the boy ran out the door and with his dad's gun in his hand, he went to the top of the hill (it's all fenced up now) and shot himself.  To this day, late at night kids can hear someone crying from that particular area.  It has always been known as a cold spot as well.



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Offline SuperFly

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3552 on: July 05, 2012, 07:15:09 PM »
My aunt who co-owned a funeral home used to have the spirits following her home at night.  Her and my uncle are tough.  They never talk about those things that go "bump" in the night.  They don't believe in it either.  They say once it's dead, it's really dead.  There's nothing more to it.  I'm sure they've experienced enough frightening things, but they don't share it with anyone.  But my aunt has mentioned a thing or two to my mom. 

My aunt said that when she goes home after running the funeral home, she goes paranoid because she would hear voices.  Voices that constantly ask her about why they're dead or where's their family, etc.  The voices would carry on even when she's trying to sleep in her bed at home.  She tries to ignore them as much as possible, but they just keep talking to her.  There were many that tried to possess her as well. 

She has converted herself to Christianity now.  She reads the bible daily and her prayers have successfully kept the spirits away from her.  The voices she hears have faded away.  My uncle is too stubborn to convert, though.  And half of the family refuses to convert.  So for some people, they find hope in God.  And that was what she was missing for a very long time.  My mom said that my aunt has gone Church-crazy because she is so deeply devoted that she spends every day in Church whether it be Hmong or Meka churches. 

So there is some good in our traditional religion and some good in other religions.



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Offline Republic

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3553 on: July 05, 2012, 07:36:52 PM »
Republic,
All your stories are well edited and prep, That's what I expect from a collage grad. Please go on with more of your spooky stories.
It seems to me that you were once a naughty dude who got lost in the mix of life then found GOD and turn your life around. Am I right?

I was never a thug or a gangster if that's what you mean.  I did have my share of fun though, mostly revolving around girls and what guys do to have fun.  I always had tremendous respect for my parents and mostly just concentrated on school, so in that respect I was never naughty.  However, finding Christ has been a wonderful blessing in my life.



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Offline Republic

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Re: Hmong ghost stories
« Reply #3554 on: July 05, 2012, 07:42:34 PM »
Before I lived in St. Paul, I was dating a girl there.  During one visit, we wanted to be alone so we went to Mound's Park.  We found a secluded spot close to sunset just to be alone.  Then out of nowhere, we both heard drums.  It wasn't like the Hmong funeral drums.  It sounded exactly like the Native American Indian drums out of the movies.  It was really faint, but we both heard it.  It went on for a long time, then it was kind of funny.  An Indian family (Indian from the country India) walked by on one of the trails and the drumming stopped.  We both got a little spooked so we got up and walked out behind them.



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