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Author Topic: Hmong Literature  (Read 369 times)

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Offline TheAfterLife

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Hmong Literature
« on: January 20, 2021, 11:56:03 AM »
Did you guys know that Hmong has Old Hmong languages that is hard to understand? Hmong literature is no joke since it dates back to China. You can say, "Hmong Shakespeare."

The phrase of, "Nyub quav ntse nees zis," dates back in the times of San Miao. It means that we are melting pot in a very bad and cruel way. San Miao fell due to allowing the enemies to mix with our people during in war times. That is understandable . Hmong literature and phrases are hard because you have to learn about that time of culture. Even the stories of Yileng and old Kwv Txhiaj/Hmong Hyms in writing are hard for all modern Hmong commoners to understand. If Hmong are to have Hmong literature in America, we have to go back to Laos, Thailand, and especially China. Hmong phrases requires history and philosophy together in order to understand about that phrase in that time.



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Offline TheAfterLife

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Re: Hmong Literature
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2021, 11:57:37 AM »
Hmong classical literature:

Learn ancient Hmong hyms, not by singing, but by learning its phrase through a literature lens.



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Offline TheAfterLife

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Re: Hmong Literature
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2021, 11:58:33 AM »
San Miao hyms: classical and romantic period.



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Offline TheAfterLife

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Re: Hmong Literature
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2021, 11:59:31 AM »
Chu Dynasty and other dynasty that we are in, they belong to the baroque period.



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Offline TheAfterLife

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Re: Hmong Literature
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2021, 02:01:13 PM »
Here's another Hmong literature phrase:

"Yog ib tug hais lus daig mplaig, los muab nws ntxuav huv kiag."

The meaning of this phrase means that if someone talks stink and down at you, you kill him/her clean. The wash means that you kill them and never get caught.

In English: If at the table has a stuck tongue, you wash him/her/them clean.



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Offline Reporter

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Re: Hmong Literature
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2021, 02:36:07 PM »
I used to listen to stories of Hmong legends riding flying horses like Pegasus, with swords on them, rising to wars in the sky, and sending updates to their companions using blood as ink on fabrics, carried back by swallows.

Which period might these tales base out of, TheAfterLife?



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Offline TheAfterLife

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Re: Hmong Literature
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2021, 03:37:02 PM »
I used to listen to stories of Hmong legends riding flying horses like Pegasus, with swords on them, rising to wars in the sky, and sending updates to their companions using blood as ink on fabrics, carried back by swallows.

Which period might these tales base out of, TheAfterLife?

This one, I don't think I ever read about this one; therefore, I will not claim that this is part of the Hmong culture for that, I don't know.

The parables and phrases, like stuck tongue, which means, "You talk down and stinky," dates back to Feudal San Miao.



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Offline Reporter

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Re: Hmong Literature
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2021, 10:14:58 AM »
I said I used to listen to.

They are oral tales, not written tales.

I’m referring to the legend of Vaj Yim Leej and others like it.

This one, I don't think I ever read about this one; therefore, I will not claim that this is part of the Hmong culture for that, I don't know.

The parables and phrases, like stuck tongue, which means, "You talk down and stinky," dates back to Feudal San Miao.



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Offline TheAfterLife

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Re: Hmong Literature
« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2021, 02:47:09 PM »
I said I used to listen to.

They are oral tales, not written tales.

I’m referring to the legend of Vaj Yim Leej and others like it.

You mean the Bamboo king? You got to go to San Miao. They said that the Bamboo king fed all of the Hmong people after his family got killed by the Chinese. He's the only prince who is an orphan; yet, Hmong travelers takes him in when they found him in a basket like Moses. After the village knows that he is from a royalty, we all know how much we don't like those tyrannical Chinese people. By taking the prince in as our advantage, the child grew and learned about his past. Yi Leng, our orphan prince and king has helped Hmong people when he is alive. Afterwards, the unity starts to rot away and head back to feudalism of confederacy. Hmong use to be a federation; however, a lot of us desire to be a confederate—like that of Miguel Felix and his people who betrayed him.



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Offline Reporter

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Re: Hmong Literature
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2021, 01:35:45 PM »
Why is that not in writing?

You mean the Bamboo king? You got to go to San Miao. They said that the Bamboo king fed all of the Hmong people after his family got killed by the Chinese. He's the only prince who is an orphan; yet, Hmong travelers takes him in when they found him in a basket like Moses. After the village knows that he is from a royalty, we all know how much we don't like those tyrannical Chinese people. By taking the prince in as our advantage, the child grew and learned about his past. Yi Leng, our orphan prince and king has helped Hmong people when he is alive. Afterwards, the unity starts to rot away and head back to feudalism of confederacy. Hmong use to be a federation; however, a lot of us desire to be a confederate—like that of Miguel Felix and his people who betrayed him.



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Offline TheAfterLife

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Re: Hmong Literature
« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2021, 08:54:14 PM »
Why is that not in writing?

Because if you learn to read and write, that's a death penalty from the Chinese. It's like what Pablo Escobar says, "plata o plomo?" Your choice because it's a force agreement.



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Offline Reporter

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Re: Hmong Literature
« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2021, 12:29:30 AM »
We have been too oppressed then.

Because if you learn to read and write, that's a death penalty from the Chinese. It's like what Pablo Escobar says, "plata o plomo?" Your choice because it's a force agreement.



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Offline TheAfterLife

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Re: Hmong Literature
« Reply #12 on: February 19, 2021, 12:35:11 AM »
We have been too oppressed then.

Indeed mon ami.



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Re: Hmong Literature
« Reply #13 on: February 19, 2021, 03:09:13 AM »
It is said that our Hmong ancestors were so oppressed and fearful that they did away with their written language by sewing their symbols onto embroideries known as paj ntaub today.

I think that's partly true because when I was in French Guiana in 1998, an elderly man named Zam Nob Yaj was telling me the etymology of the phrase "xa xov." He said Hmong people delivered messages by the colors of threads or strings. If it was an urgent matter, the messenger takes along a red thread; if just ordinary or other less urgent matters such as greetings, then a white threat.

The messenger would carry the thread (xov) from the sender to the receiver. Once there, the messenger would give the recipient the thread and tells him or her where it came from. Some times, there were threads in sewing needles or safety pins that allowed the messenger to attach it to the recipient's chest or collar to give the message.

The method eliminated the visible writing entirely, so that the ruling oppressors wouldn't know our ancestors still had a communication system in place.

That's how and why we have come to call "delivering/sending a message"  "xa xov." They were really sending the thread.
 


« Last Edit: February 19, 2021, 03:13:31 AM by Reporter »

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Offline TheAfterLife

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Re: Hmong Literature
« Reply #14 on: February 20, 2021, 07:30:07 PM »
It is said that our Hmong ancestors were so oppressed and fearful that they did away with their written language by sewing their symbols onto embroideries known as paj ntaub today.

I think that's partly true because when I was in French Guiana in 1998, an elderly man named Zam Nob Yaj was telling me the etymology of the phrase "xa xov." He said Hmong people delivered messages by the colors of threads or strings. If it was an urgent matter, the messenger takes along a red thread; if just ordinary or other less urgent matters such as greetings, then a white threat.

The messenger would carry the thread (xov) from the sender to the receiver. Once there, the messenger would give the recipient the thread and tells him or her where it came from. Some times, there were threads in sewing needles or safety pins that allowed the messenger to attach it to the recipient's chest or collar to give the message.

The method eliminated the visible writing entirely, so that the ruling oppressors wouldn't know our ancestors still had a communication system in place.

That's how and why we have come to call "delivering/sending a message"  "xa xov." They were really sending the thread.
 

This dates back in the fall of Chu Dynasty. The Queen of the Hmong people got forced married to the Qin Emperor since she is like our Queen Esther. She made our men wear Paj Ntaub to remind us and our writings as well. The story goes of how the Qin wonders why Hmong men starts to wear women's clothing. That's because the Qin Emperor burned the Hmong language; also, our Queen lied to him that this is our custom of living. So he accept it and accept the lie so that he won't kill her and the Hmong people with their writings on their clothes. It's to remind us of who we are. Without her, I think Hmong history will be lost.


« Last Edit: February 25, 2021, 09:59:14 PM by TheAfterLife »

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