Advertisement

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - techy

Pages: [1] 2
1
Joy is right of course.  People are not perfect and our parents have their own way of doing things.  As long as they love you and are not intentionally doing things to harm you, patience should be exercise, as time with them is limited.  If it is driving you crazy, then take a break and move away for a little (time and space to get your thoughts together).

From your examples, your parents sound like any other parents.  Learn from your mistake.  Get a safe/lock and don't give the access to those you wouldn't want accessing it.  Some people can't help themselves.

2
High School Years / Re: When a GED is not enough...
« on: October 17, 2019, 06:24:15 PM »
I think it's a great idea.  Just make sure your child is mentally, socially, and academically ready.  Sometimes we forget the soft skills are also learned through normal education process - friends, teamwork, study skills, mental resilience to take on loads and loads of work, ability to deal with unclear expectations, and experience to understand the context of what university level education may expect.  Know your child well enough so that you don't set your child up for failure either.

As long as we can give them all the soft social skills and they are ready academically, we shouldn't let the system hold back the brilliance of our future generations.

3
High School Years / Re: How were you like in high school?
« on: October 17, 2019, 06:12:09 PM »
Typical nerd. Hung out with our small Hmong crowd/club when I could.  I did all the AP and IB classes and competed in academic competitions. Read a bunch because I couldn't socialize much outside of the cultural weekend activities.  Life was simple when you didn't know much. We were barely freshmen then...

4
High School Years / Re: high school friends
« on: October 17, 2019, 05:59:10 PM »
Friend A - Teaching FCC
Friend B - Consulting as CS support
Friend C - Truck driver
Friend D - Suicided

Lost touch with some others.  For occupation, I think where there is a will, there is a way.  How much time and resource are you willing to spend on chasing it, is the real question.

5
Positive News / Re: Noah Lor running for Mayor in Merced, CA
« on: August 24, 2019, 01:39:03 PM »
Looks like he lost the race by a very small margin 47% to 52% to Stanley Thurston. That's a good attempt. Was there any learning?

6
College Life / Re: IT Internship
« on: August 24, 2019, 12:27:44 PM »
It's been a while now. How did this experience work out?

7
College Life / Re: Do you regret going into your major/degree?
« on: August 24, 2019, 12:19:15 PM »
No regrets.  With a bachelor in a technical field, you are usually given grunt work.  You have to prove myself a lot and hardly use your brain in the work that you do; things can be very boring.  With an advanced degree, a person is trusted with more responsibiliti es, scope, and growth.  Last but not least, there are the connections that you get from doing advanced studies: meeting other experts in the field at conferences to discuss current evolving knowledge, working with peers under a program of studies, exchanging data/ideas with collaborators outside of your specialization, and bouncing ideas with researchers/professors in the forefront of their specialization .

8
College Life / Re: Should I keep going ?
« on: August 24, 2019, 12:02:12 PM »
Losing a parent is one the hardest thing to deal with in life and you lost both in such short time.  So sorry to hear that.

The things we do in life should be done with purpose or else it will not be as meaningful and may lead to regrets later on.  Our goals changes all the time, as it should be adapted to changes in our life and lessons learned.  I get it that you had started out with BA in sociology and was planning to pursue postgraduate work in social work but if you are in the medical field now and enjoy it, then updating to MSPA is probably the right thing for you now.  But just realize that going back to school means you have to live like a student again for that full duration: study 24/7, live on little source of income (all your "luxury" livings like cell/car/house will need to be cut down), limited recreational/social activities, etc... Given your time off and likely less background in the science field required for your current degree, you may need to refresh a lot of your basic math and science.  Even then you may struggle more in the program than your peers. If you are single and are determined than the decision is much easier.  If you are attached or have kids, then you do need to consider the impact to them as well.  Keep in mind that the great things in life take a lot of effort and hard work.  Higher education is helpful not only in getting the credential but also in gaining the necessary knowledge to better live your life.  You may even consider getting your feet wet again by taking some refresher math and science courses at the community college to gauge your readiness and if you really want to commit to this.  The first impression you make to the MSPA program staff will be carried through the program so just make sure that is a good one.  Good luck in which ever decision you make.


9
There is always two sides to a story.  Get the perspective from the older siblings too before passing judgement. 

If I was in the youngest son situation, I would make the best of the situation. Enjoy time with my parents.  Spending time with our parents is never a waste of time.  So what if the other siblings don't want to spend time with our parents.  That is their lost.  If we manage to keep our parents happy enough, they will have less time to worry about the other siblings not calling them.  Our parents tears are a direct reflection of our failure as much as our other siblings.

In terms of responsibiliti es for our kids or parents, I am with Duma on this though. We shouldn't expect our kids to look after us, should they chose not to.  But if we role model the love that we like our kids to follow (love our parents with sincerity), then more than likely our own kids will value the same and love us the same way (whether we expect them to or not).   

10
General Discussion / Re: Better pay or great corporation
« on: November 14, 2018, 08:37:01 PM »
Better corp

11
Helpful. Thanks for posting this. I'd advocate putting this into one of those useful references.

12
The Best of PebHmong / Re: Daily Quotations
« on: October 20, 2018, 02:52:07 PM »
(for cultivating innovations) Make new mistakes everyday.

(along the line of some of the earlier quotes and it's a great quote to remember when you aren't happy with how things are) If you keep doing what you are doing, you'll keep getting what you are getting.

(similar line of thoughts to move us beyond the ordinary to the extra-ordinary) If you do what everybody does, you get what everybody gets.

13
Thanks for sharing the article.  It is an interesting perspective.

We (as Hmong people) definitely can do a better job at nurturing our gifted children and geniuses.  I'm sure many geniuses have fallen through the cracks due to lack of resources and bad parenting. Maybe a worthwhile topic would be put forth best known practices for how to best nurture our future geniuses, in light of our cultural practices and general lack of good readily available resources.

14
Science, Ideas & Research / Re: Paper Planes
« on: October 06, 2018, 11:20:43 AM »
Care to share some designs for flight time and for distance?

15
In growing up and with better understanding of human psychology, I start to realize that many Hmong people are using traditional practices as a way to "bully" others.

A very generic example, I often hear is that "if you don't come help us this weekend, we're not going to help you next week end."  Why can't we help for the sake of helping or do you think this is appropriate behavior.  There are definitely worst examples from funeral and wedding traditional practices.  Anyone else seeing this?

Pages: [1] 2
Advertisements