Advertisement

Author Topic: If this White dude actually tried it and didn't like it, I don't see too much  (Read 113 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online theking

  • Elite Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 39956
  • Respect: +880
    • View Profile
..of an issue but if he's never tried it then he's just an ignorant idiot  ;D:

James Corden gets called out for mocking Filipino cuisine and other Asian dishes

“The Late Late Show” host James Corden is facing backlash for a segment on his TV show that many online are deeming “incredibly culturally offensive.”

The segment, “Spill Your Guts or Fill Your Guts,” is a riff on “truth or dare” that gives celebrity guests the choice between answering an embarrassing question or eating food Corden has deemed unappetizing or inedible.




Like this post: 0

Adverstisement

Offline DaCurse

  • Jr. Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 1627
  • Respect: +65
    • View Profile
he needs to check his roots...In France and other parts of europe they eat duck eggs like that...lols



Like this post: 0

Online theking

  • Elite Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 39956
  • Respect: +880
    • View Profile
Like I teach my daughter, gotta actually try it so you can make an educated opinion.. O0



Like this post: 0

Online theking

  • Elite Poster
  • *****
  • Posts: 39956
  • Respect: +880
    • View Profile
Tom Nichols: I said I couldn't stand Indian food. Then a Twitter friend took me to dinner.


This is a story about how the internet and social media can be a positive influence on even the most provincial and opinionated among us.

And by “us” I mean, mostly, “me,” but this is also a story about the spontaneous generosity of thousands of people. It is also a story about the healing power of food. But before this happy ending, it was a story about a man – again, I mean “me” – who managed to insult over a billion people.

It all started in 2019, when in response to an open invitation from a user on Twitter to post our most controversial food takes, I decided to bypass all the hatred for mayonnaise and other foods, and to fire off a zinger about the cuisine of an entire subcontinent. “Indian food,” I said, “is terrible and we pretend it isn’t.”

Of course, I thought I was tweaking my American friends who sweated and gasped their way through dishes of thermonuclear spiciness, but my clumsy attempt at wit soon ignited an international firestorm. (You can read the whole amazing story here.) Eventually, the furor died down, as such things always do. But several of my friends, and more than a few acquaintances I knew only through social media, insisted that I should give Indian food another try one day.

One of those acquaintances was former United States attorney Preet Bharara. Preet and I had never met, although we often read and commented on each other’s views, as we were both dedicated opponents of former president Donald Trump. But this was beyond politics: Preet offered to take me for Indian food when the pandemic lifted. I promised I would put myself in his hands at any restaurant of his choosing.

The thing about making a promise like that, especially when you give it to a former prosecutor like Preet, is that he will remember it and the day will come when you have to make good on it. And sure enough, after talking about our vaccinations and our relief at the return of normality, Preet reminded me that I was due for a fine Indian dinner.




Like this post: 0

 

Advertisements